EVENTS

Calendar

Feb
17
Wed
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom
Feb 17 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom

Margaret Price: Everyday Survival and Collective Action: What We Can Learn from Disabled Faculty in a Time of Unwellness

The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has raised startling questions about everyday life—for example, “How is it possible that I am required to do a full-time job while also providing full-time care for my family?” or “How can I negotiate questions of ‘safety’ with my co-workers, my community, even my closest loved ones?” These questions surged into the limelight in 2020, yet few realize that they were already active topics of conversation in small, interdependent communities of disabled, BIPOC, queer, and otherwise marginalized people. In this talk, Margaret Price draws upon data from a survey and interview study with disabled faculty (https://margaretprice.wordpress.com/disabled-faculty-study) to highlight themes such as “time,” “cost,” “technology,” and “accountability.” These themes not only teach us more about the everyday lives and strategies of disabled faculty members, but also demonstrate that all participants in higher education will benefit from a cultural shift toward shared accountability and interdependent forms of care.

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Mar
18
Thu
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom
Mar 18 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom

Stephanie Kerschbaum

Title: “Signs of Disability in the Writing Center”

RSVP LINK

Abstract: Where and how and when does disability emerge in the writing center? In this talk, Stephanie Kerschbaum will briefly discuss her concept of “signs of disability” and how it can usefully inform the way we approach our work in the writing center. Signs of disability are material-discursive-rhetorical cues that point to the presence of disability in some way, shape or form. One way for writing center staff and tutors to orient to these signs is to think about the stories we tell about our experiences and what those stories might reveal about where we are putting our attention (or not putting it). Attendees will have a chance to do some freewriting and reflection during the talk.

Bio: Stephanie L. Kerschbaum is currently Associate Professor of English at the University of Delaware, and beginning July 1, 2021, she will be Associate Professor and Director of the Expository Writing Program at the University of Washington. Her first book, Toward a New Rhetoric of Difference, won the 2015 CCCC Advancement of Knowledge Book Award and she is the co-editor of Negotiating Disability: Disclosure and Higher Education. Her work has appeared in a range of journals and collections, and she’s currently at work on a book called Signs of Disability focused on how disability becomes available for noticing in everyday encounters. She can be reached at kersch.uw@gmail.com and loves to hear about all kinds of signs of disability from other people.

RSVP LINK

Mar
26
Fri
Anti-Asian Racism Online Forum
Mar 26 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

An online forum in solidarity with members of Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) communities:

The racist violence directed against Asian Pacific Islander Desi American communities has
a long history and the recent killings in Georgia are a reminder of the continuing cruel
legacy of anti-Asian policies put in place in the 19th and 20th centuries. The previous US
the administration gave license to the racist and sexist violence of the shooter, whose actions
reflect the ugly attitudes that persist in contemporary US politics and culture.

As scholars and students committed to anti-racism, equity, and justice, we are coming together to challenge the racist discourse on COVID 19 and the growing number of anti-Asian hate crimes in the US. Come hear MSU faculty address these issues.

Speakers:
Siddharth Chandra, Yen-Hwei Lin, Josh Yumibe, Hui-Ling Malone, Abhishek Narula, Sheng-mei Ma, and Naoko Wake.

The event has been organized by the Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities program, in partnership with the Asian Studies Center and Asian Pacific American Studies Program, and is sponsored by the College of Arts and Letters.

Register here: Webinar Registration – Zoom

Apr
9
Fri
Creative Arts Activities (day one)
Apr 9 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Apr
16
Fri
Creative Arts Activities (day two)
Apr 16 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Apr
27
Tue
Anti-South Asian Violence, White Supremacy, and Xenophobia: Reflections in the Wake of the Indianapolis Shooting
Apr 27 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Anti-South Asian Violence, White Supremacy, and Xenophobia: Reflections in the Wake of the Indianapolis Shooting

A virtual panel discussion addressing the urgent need to take
seriously recent assaults against South Asians in the US and
also the history of anti-South Asian racism, and in particular
the forms of xenophobia targeting Sikh Americans.

PANELISTS
Divya Victor, Michigan State University
Jyotsna Singh, Michigan State University
Samip Mallick, South Asian American Digital Archive
Harleen Singh, Brandeis University
Arvind-Pal Mandair, University of Michigan
Moderator: Siddharth Chandra, Michigan State University

Organized by Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities in collaboration with the Asian Studies Center at MSU
Co-Sponsors: Department of English |Creative Writing Program | India Council| Muslim Studies Program

Zoom Registration link: Webinar Registration – Zoom