EVENTS

Calendar

Sep
13
Sun
An Unending Journey to the Dream of Being Part of Israeli Society: Challenges and Successes @ Remote
Sep 13 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

https://msu.zoom.us/j/99768441097
Meeting ID: 997 6844 1097 | Passcode: 914221

A conversation with Michal Avera Samuel, Director of the Fidel Association, the leading Israeli NGO representing the interests and aspirations of Ethiopian Israelis.
A social leader and educational activist advocating for the successful integration of Ethiopian Israelis, Ms. Samuel has over 18 years of experience in directing educational projects. She has served as Fidel’s Executive Director since 2011. Ms. Samuel has an MA in Educational Counseling from Haifa University and is regularly invited to lecture on the Ethiopian Israeli community’s history, culture and absorption at academic institutions and schools across Israel.
Ms. Samuel was born in Gondar, Ethiopia. She is the youngest of nine children, and made aliyah with her family in 1984 as part of Operation Moses via Sudan. She joined the Fidel Association in the year 2000 and served as Director of Professional Training, PR, and Community Development, as well as Deputy Director prior to being appointed Executive Director in 2011. Ms. Samuel serves on the Government of Israel’s prestigious Round Table Panel on Social Issues, which brings together leaders from the public, private and non-profit sectors.
Ms. Samuel’s vast experience includes serving as a research assistant to MK Naomi Blumenthal on the Knesset’s Immigration Committee and as Spokesperson and Advisor to the Scholarship Fund for Ethiopian Jews (SFEJ), Boca Raton, Florida. Beyond her dedication to advancing the Ethiopian-Israeli community, Ms. Samuel serves as a Board Member of the Israel Center for Educational Innovation and volunteers at “Women to Women,” Haifa, supporting victims of domestic violence.

Sep
29
Tue
Aspects of the Reception of Flavius Josephus in the Middle Ages: The Greek-Speaking East and the Latin-Speaking West by Theofili Kampianaki
Sep 29 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Tuesday, September 29th at 5:00 pm

Click here to register

Aspects of the Reception of Flavius Josephus in the Middle Ages: The Greek-Speaking East and the Latin-Speaking West

No Jewish works, except the biblical texts, were used by Christians on such a large scale as the Judean Antiquities and Judean War of the Jewish-Roman historian Flavius Josephus (37-100 CE). His works (narrating the events from the biblical Creation to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE) became central to the construction of Christian thought and identity across the Greek-speaking East and the Latin-speaking West in the Middle Ages. Dr. Kampianaki will explore the reasons why and the ways through which a notable Jewish author, such as Josephus, entered the Christian sphere, while his Jewish origins were still being acknowledged.

Theofili Kampianaki is a Research Fellow at the School of History and Cultures in the University of Birmingham in the UK. She holds a Master’s and a Doctorate in Medieval Greek and Latin Languages from the University of Oxford.

ONLINE Lecture: Aspects of the Reception of Flavius Josephus in the Middle Ages @ Online event
Sep 29 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
ONLINE Lecture: Aspects of the Reception of Flavius Josephus in the Middle Ages @ Online event

Aspects of the Reception of Flavius Josephus in the Middle Ages: The Greek-Speaking East and the Latin-Speaking West

No Jewish works, except the biblical texts, were used by Christians on such a large scale as the Judean Antiquities and Judean War of the Jewish-Roman historian Flavius Josephus (37-100 CE). His works (narrating the events from the biblical Creation to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE) became central to the construction of Christian thought and identity across the Greek-speaking East and the Latin-speaking West in the Middle Ages. Dr. Kampianaki will explore the reasons why and the ways through which a notable Jewish author, such as Josephus, entered the Christian sphere, while his Jewish origins were still being acknowledged.

Theofili Kampianaki is a Research Fellow at the School of History and Cultures in the University of Birmingham in the UK. She holds a Master’s and a Doctorate in Medieval Greek and Latin Languages from the University of Oxford.

Co-sponsors: College of Arts and Letters, James Madison College, College of Social Science, Residential
College of Arts and Humanities, Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives, Department of History, and
the Department of Religious Studies.

Oct
6
Tue
Keeping the Door Open to Israeli-Palestinian Peace @ Zoom
Oct 6 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Panel on “Keeping the Door Open to Israeli-Palestinian Peace,” moderated by Yael Aronoff with Ghaith Al-Omari, Daniel C. Kurtzer, David Makovsky and Saliba Sarsar

Tuesday, October 6th at 7pm Register here

Ghaith al-Omari
“Small Steps Towards a
Big Goal: Preserving the Two-State Solution in Times of Profound Change”
Ghaith al-Omari, Esq. argues that the Two-State Solution remains the only
option for resolving the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in a way that meets both people’s national aspirations. The talk will examine ways to preserve the future viability of a two-state solution.
Ghaith al-Omari, Senior Fellow in The Washington Institute’s Irwin Levy Family Program on the U.S.-Israel Strategic Relationship, is the former Executive Director of the American Task Force on Palestine. He served as Advisor to the Negotiating Team during the 1999–2001 Permanent-Status Talks in addition to holding various other positions within the Palestinian Authority.

 

Daniel C. Kurtzer
“Top-Down, Bottom-Up, Inside-Out, Outside-In: Which Way to Israeli-Palestinian peace?”
The old formula for trying to achieve peace between Israel and the Palestinians has not worked, and consideration is now being given to new, single-focus paradigms. There is a need for a comprehensive, multi-layered approach, driven by determined leaders.
Daniel C. Kurtzer is the S. Daniel Abraham Professor of Middle East Policy Studies at Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs. During a 29-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, Ambassador Kurtzer served as the United States Ambassador to Israel and as the United States Ambassador to Egypt. He served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Near Eastern Affairs and as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Intelligence and Research.

 

David Makovsky
“Bridge or Bypass Road? How Do Peace Moves between Arab States and Israel Challenge the Way We Think about the Palestinian Issue?”
The Arab Peace Initiative of 2003 was predicated on the view that the best way to provide leverage to the Palestinians was to forestall Arab-Israel peacemaking until after Palestinian demands had been met. Yet, the shifting sands in the Middle East where countries are concerned about destabilization have caused a rethink of the classic paradigm. Can the Emirati-Israeli diplomatic breakthrough change the approach and lead to better results in the Israeli-Palestinian arena?
David Makovsky is the Ziegler Distinguished Fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy and Director of the Project on Arab-Israel Relations. He is also an adjunct professor in Middle East Studies at Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). In 2013-2014, he worked in the Office of the U.S. Secretary of State, serving as a senior advisor to the Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations.

 

 

Dr. Saliba Sarsar
“Finding Common Ground to Move Toward Peace”
Israelis and Palestinians have no choice but to keep the door open to peace. The path – our path — will remain challenged and challenging unless we overcome our fear of the other, our fear of the unknown that seems to dominate the best of us. Our obsession with power, resources, and retaliation has taken hold of our soul and twisted our being. Peace is born by preparing for it. The responsibility and credit for peace rest with all of us.
Dr. Saliba Sarsar, born and raised in Jerusalem, is Professor of Political Science at Monmouth University. His teaching and scholarly interests focus on the Middle East, Palestinian-Israeli affairs, Jerusalem, and peacebuilding. He is the author of Peacebuilding in Israeli-Palestinian Relations (2020) and Jerusalem: The Home in Our Hearts (2018). His most recent edited book is What Jerusalem Means to Us: Christian Perspectives and Reflections (2018).

Oct
13
Tue
Virtual Screening and Discussion: They Ain’t Ready For Me (2020)
Oct 13 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Register here and get a link to the movie!
Join our Post-film discussion led by by Tamar Manasseh and Brad Rothschild (director)

They Ain’t Ready For Me is the story of Tamar Manasseh, the African American
rabbinical student who is leading the fight against senseless killings on the south
side of Chicago. The film explores the challenges and motivations of this fearless
community leader as she works to prevent more people from being killed by gun
violence. Tamar’s complex identity and magnetic personality combine to make her a
force to be reckoned with, and she hasn’t even hit her stride yet.

 

Co-sponsors: College of Arts and Letters, James Madison College, The Residential College in the Arts and Humanities, Department of History, Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives.

Nov
5
Thu
Yiddish Children’s Literature and the Jewish Twentieth Century: A Conversation
Nov 5 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Yiddish Children’s Literature and the Jewish Twentieth Century: A Conversation

Thursday, November 5th, at 7:00 pm |  Register here

Miriam Udel will be discussing her book, Honey on the Page: A Treasury of Yiddish Children’s Literature, that was just published in October 2020. The book is her edition and translation of Yiddish Children’s Literature.
Udel is Associate Professor of German Studies and Jewish Studies at Emory University, where her teaching focuses on Yiddish language, literature, and culture. She holds an AB in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from Harvard University, as well as a PhD in Comparative Literature from the same institution. She was ordained in 2019 as part of the first cohort of the Executive Ordination Track at Yeshivat Maharat, a program designed to bring qualified mid-career women into the Orthodox rabbinate.

Nov
10
Tue
The Life and Legacy of RuthBader Ginsburg in the Historical Context of Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court
Nov 10 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Tuesday, November 10th, at 7:00 pm | Register Here

Dr. David Dalin will discuss his book Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court, from Brandeis to Kagan, which was selected as a finalist for the 2017 National Jewish Book Award. The talk examines the lives, legal careers, and Jewish legacies of the eight Jews who have served or who currently serve as justices of the U.S. Supreme Court: Louis D. Brandeis, Benjamin Cardozo, Felix Frankfurter, Arthur Goldberg, Abe Fortas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer, and Elena Kagan.
Dr. David Dalin, who is a Senior Research Fellow at Brandeis University, is the author, co-author, or editor of twelve books, including Religion and State in the American Jewish Experience (co-authored with Jonathan D. Sarna) and The Presidents of the United States and the Jews.

Photography by: ©Michael B. Lloyd
Nov
17
Tue
Please join Congresswomen Elissa Slotkin and Brenda Lawrence as they provide their remarks on the work of the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus
Nov 17 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Please join Congresswomen Elissa Slotkin and Brenda Lawrence as they provide their remarks on the work of the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus

Please join Congresswomen Elissa Slotkin and Brenda Lawrence as they provide their remarks on the work of the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus; their thoughts on future collaboration, and reflections on the film.
November 17th, 6:30-7:30 pm
Register here

After registering, a link to view “Shared Legacies: The African American-Jewish Civil Rights Alliance” will be emailed back and
available to view Nov. 11-17.


The crucial historical lessons of Black-Jewish cooperation are revisited and revived in this utterly fascinating, urgent call to action. The modern alliance between African-Americans and Jewish Americans dates to the NAACP founding in 1909. Since then, both groups have endured segregation and racism, from the codified bigotry of southern Jim Crow laws, to blatant bias in real estate, employment, higher education and politics. Common cause was found in the turbulent ‘60s Civil Rights era, as Jewish leaders backed Dr. King’s efforts at racial equality and harmony. Yet, the relationship has frayed in recent years, as a once mighty bond of support and respect has seemingly faded, been forgotten or ignored. With divisive seeds of hate taking root anew in the American landscape, a new generation also affirms their pledge to actively promote the values of social justice. This potent, inspiring story of unity, empathy and partnership validates the ubiquity of the human experience, and how freedom and equality for all can be achieved only when people come together.


Co-sponsors: College of Arts and Letters, James Madison College, RCAH, College of Social Science, Department of History and Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives.

 

Nov
19
Thu
Jewish Women and Power @ Zoom
Nov 19 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Jewish Women and Power

Book Discussion with Melissa Klapper and with Lori Harrison-Kahan

Thursday, November 19th, at 3:00 pm Register here

*Complimentary book copies are available to the first 20 to request at
jewishst@msu.edu, please include your name and mailing address by October 5

This discussion is part of a conference sponsored by the Center for Gender in Global Context entitled “Gender, Women’s Suffrage, and Political Power: Past, Present, and Future.”

American Jewish Women and the Politics of Power in the Turn-of-the-Century Women’s Movement
During the last decades of the 19th century and first decades of the 20th century, American Jewish women participated in all the great women’s movements of their day: suffrage, birth control, and peace. Their activism has been largely erased from the narratives of the women’s movement, yet they exerted real power within these movements and exemplified the complex relationships among social justice and the politics of identity.

Dr. Melissa R. Klapper is a Professor of History and Director of Women’s & Gender Studies at Rowan University. She is the author of Jewish Girls Coming of Age in America, 1860-1920 (NYU, 2005): Small Strangers: The Experiences of Immigrant Children in the United States, 1880-1925 (Ivan R. Dee, 2007); and Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace: American Jewish Women’s Activism, 1890-1940 (NYU, 2013), which won the National Jewish Book Award in Women’s Studies. Her newest book is Ballet Class: An American History (Oxford, 2020).

The Superwoman: How a Jewish Journalist Empowered Women to Fight for the Vote
Lori Harrison-Kahan
 will discuss her recent book The Superwoman and Other Writings, an edited collection of journalism and fiction by Miriam Michelson. One of the earliest women journalists in San Francisco in the 1890s, Michelson went on to become a suffrage activist and a bestselling author of feminist fiction like “The Superwoman,” a novella that inspired the “Wonder Woman” comics. Harrison-Kahan’s talk will address Michelson’s upbringing as the daughter of Jewish immigrants in Virginia City, Nevada; her influence on politics in the Progressive Era; and her relevance to contemporary movements like #MeToo.
Lori Harrison-Kahan teaches at Boston College and is the author of The White Negress: Literature, Minstrelsy, and the Black-Jewish Imaginary (Rutgers UP, 2011), an honorable mention for the Society for the Study of American Women Writers Book Award. She edited The Superwoman and Other Writings by Miriam Michelson (Wayne State UP, 2019), co-edited Heirs of Yesterday by Emma Wolf (forthcoming in 2020), and is currently co-editing a collection of writings by suffragist author and editor Elizabeth Garver Jordan. Lori received the American Studies Association’s Gloria E. Anzaldúa Award and the Western American Literature Association’s Don D. Walker Prize. Her current project, “West of the Ghetto: Pioneering Women Writers, Progressive Era San Francisco, and Jewish Literary Culture,” has received support from the NEH, the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, Berkeley’s Bancroft Library, and the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture. In honor of the centennial of the 19th Amendment, Lori has been a featured speaker at the Newseum, the Library of Congress, and other venues.

Nov
20
Fri
Jewish Women, Citizenship, Suffrage, and Sexuality
Nov 20 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Jewish Women, Citizenship, Suffrage, and Sexuality

Register here

This discussion is part of a conference sponsored by the Center for Gender in Global Context entitled “Gender, Women’s Suffrage, and Political Power: Past, Present, and Future.”

Moderator: Kirsten Fermaglich, Michigan State University, Department of History and Associate Director of the Serling Institute.

Discussant: Melissa R. Klapper, Rowan University, Department of History.

“An Anti-Suffrage Club”: Jewish Women and Domestic Feminism in Progressive-Era San Francisco.
Lori Harrison-Kahan, Boston College, Department of English.

“The Information is Only to Mothers”: Gender, Class, Yiddish, and Reproductive Politics at the 46 Amboy St. Clinic in Brownsville, Brooklyn
Cassandra Euphrat Weston, University of Michigan, Jean & Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies.

Able to Enter: Gender and Disability in Cecilia Razovsky’s Immigration Advocacy
Hannah Greene, New York University, Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies

 

 

Co-sponsors: Center for Gender in Global Context, College of Arts and Letters, James Madison College, The RCAH, Department of History, College of Social Science and Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives.