EVENTS

Calendar

Nov
12
Thu
New date–MSU Signature Lecture Series with Claudia Rankine @ Online event
Nov 12 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
New date--MSU Signature Lecture Series with Claudia Rankine @ Online event | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

The College of Arts & Letters and MSU Broad Museum are pleased to announce the Fall 2020 Signature Lecture with Claudia Rankine

Poet, essayist, playwright, and the editor of several anthologies. She is the author of six volumes of poetry, three plays, and various essays.

Her book of poetry, Citizen: An American Lyric, won the 2014 Los Angeles Times Book Award; the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry, the first book in the award’s history to be nominated in both poetry and criticism; the 2015 Forward Prize for Best Collection, the 2015 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in Poetry; the 2015 NAACP Image Award in poetry; the 2015 PEN Open Book Award; the 2015 PEN American Center USA Literary Award; the 2015 PEN Oakland-Josephine Miles Literary Award; and the 2015 VIDA Literary Award. Citizen was also a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award and the 2015 T.S. Eliot Prize. It is the only poetry book to be a New York Times Bestseller in the nonfiction category.

This online event will begin at 7 pm.  Register here for the ZOOM webinar link.

You can also watch this event on Facebook Live or YouTubeLive.

Check out our pop up online independent book store partner, Literati Bookstore to order copies of Claudia Rankine’s books and find other social justice and anti-racism texts.

About the Signature Lecture Series

Originally founded as the Celebrity Lecture Series in 1998 by the College of Arts & Letters and the Dean’s Community Council, the series was later renamed the Signature Lecture Series in 20017 and allows notable public figures to interact and engage with the faculty, students, and greater community of Michigan State University through conversations and discussions.

The popularity of this series has attracted some of the most illustrious scholars, critics, novelists, poets, film producers, and creative artists of our time, including Soledad O’Brien, Ken Burns, Oliver Stone, Richard Ford, and Maya Angelou, just to name a few.

Sponsors of the Signature Lecture Series are the following:

  • College of Arts & Letters
  • Broad Art Museum
  • MSU Libraries
  • Department of English
  • Creative Writing Program
  • Film Studies Program
  • Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures

This event is being held in collaboration with the MSU Broad Art Museum Artist’s Project Series “John Lucas and Claudia Rankine: Situations” Exhibition. The MSU Broad presents, for the first time in a solo exhibition, the entire series of Situation videos collaboratively produced by documentary filmmaker John Lucas and poet Claudia Rankine since 2008. The videos address the vexed notion of a post-racial United States, a term coined in the Obama era to assert that the election of an African American president indicated the achievement of racial equality, by foregrounding the public and private experiences of black Americans. The exhibition is on February 8-December 26, 2020.

Nov
17
Tue
Please join Congresswomen Elissa Slotkin and Brenda Lawrence as they provide their remarks on the work of the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus
Nov 17 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Please join Congresswomen Elissa Slotkin and Brenda Lawrence as they provide their remarks on the work of the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus

Please join Congresswomen Elissa Slotkin and Brenda Lawrence as they provide their remarks on the work of the Black-Jewish Congressional Caucus; their thoughts on future collaboration, and reflections on the film.
November 17th, 6:30-7:30 pm
Register here

After registering, a link to view “Shared Legacies: The African American-Jewish Civil Rights Alliance” will be emailed back and
available to view Nov. 11-17.


The crucial historical lessons of Black-Jewish cooperation are revisited and revived in this utterly fascinating, urgent call to action. The modern alliance between African-Americans and Jewish Americans dates to the NAACP founding in 1909. Since then, both groups have endured segregation and racism, from the codified bigotry of southern Jim Crow laws, to blatant bias in real estate, employment, higher education and politics. Common cause was found in the turbulent ‘60s Civil Rights era, as Jewish leaders backed Dr. King’s efforts at racial equality and harmony. Yet, the relationship has frayed in recent years, as a once mighty bond of support and respect has seemingly faded, been forgotten or ignored. With divisive seeds of hate taking root anew in the American landscape, a new generation also affirms their pledge to actively promote the values of social justice. This potent, inspiring story of unity, empathy and partnership validates the ubiquity of the human experience, and how freedom and equality for all can be achieved only when people come together.


Co-sponsors: College of Arts and Letters, James Madison College, RCAH, College of Social Science, Department of History and Office for Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives.

 

Feb
4
Thu
Jay Dolmage Lecture @ Zoom
Feb 4 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Jay Dolmage Lecture @ Zoom

Jay Dolmage: Ableism, Access, and Inclusion: Disability in Higher Education Before, During and After Covid-19.

 

In this workshop, we will collaborate to address the ableist attitudes, policies, and practices that are built into higher education. We will also interrogate the minimal and temporary means we have been given to address inequities, and the cost such an approach has for disabled students and faculty. We will explore our own ableist biases, apologies and defenses in an effort to build tools for a much more accessible future at Michigan State, while we also examine how disability has been situated in higher education before, during and (someday) after Covid-19.

RSVP Link

Feb
17
Wed
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom
Feb 17 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom

Margaret Price: Everyday Survival and Collective Action: What We Can Learn from Disabled Faculty in a Time of Unwellness

The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has raised startling questions about everyday life—for example, “How is it possible that I am required to do a full-time job while also providing full-time care for my family?” or “How can I negotiate questions of ‘safety’ with my co-workers, my community, even my closest loved ones?” These questions surged into the limelight in 2020, yet few realize that they were already active topics of conversation in small, interdependent communities of disabled, BIPOC, queer, and otherwise marginalized people. In this talk, Margaret Price draws upon data from a survey and interview study with disabled faculty (https://margaretprice.wordpress.com/disabled-faculty-study) to highlight themes such as “time,” “cost,” “technology,” and “accountability.” These themes not only teach us more about the everyday lives and strategies of disabled faculty members, but also demonstrate that all participants in higher education will benefit from a cultural shift toward shared accountability and interdependent forms of care.

Click here to RSVP

Mar
18
Thu
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom
Mar 18 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom

Stephanie Kerschbaum

Title: “Signs of Disability in the Writing Center”

RSVP LINK

Abstract: Where and how and when does disability emerge in the writing center? In this talk, Stephanie Kerschbaum will briefly discuss her concept of “signs of disability” and how it can usefully inform the way we approach our work in the writing center. Signs of disability are material-discursive-rhetorical cues that point to the presence of disability in some way, shape or form. One way for writing center staff and tutors to orient to these signs is to think about the stories we tell about our experiences and what those stories might reveal about where we are putting our attention (or not putting it). Attendees will have a chance to do some freewriting and reflection during the talk.

Bio: Stephanie L. Kerschbaum is currently Associate Professor of English at the University of Delaware, and beginning July 1, 2021, she will be Associate Professor and Director of the Expository Writing Program at the University of Washington. Her first book, Toward a New Rhetoric of Difference, won the 2015 CCCC Advancement of Knowledge Book Award and she is the co-editor of Negotiating Disability: Disclosure and Higher Education. Her work has appeared in a range of journals and collections, and she’s currently at work on a book called Signs of Disability focused on how disability becomes available for noticing in everyday encounters. She can be reached at kersch.uw@gmail.com and loves to hear about all kinds of signs of disability from other people.

RSVP LINK

Mar
25
Thu
Town Hall Discussion about Anti-Asian Violence
Mar 25 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Town Hall Discussion about Anti-Asian Violence

In light of recent anti-Asian violence, APASO, APIDA/AFSA, and OCAT invite members of the MSU community to come air and discuss their experiences. We aim to have this as a safe space for community members to share their stories and to be heard. We also want to hear your ideas about how MSU can better support the APIDA community. It’s important that we stand together in these hard times, and we want you to feel heard.

Registration: https://msu.zoom.us/…/register/WN_NObwUtHVQWy4NgAs5DB1kQ

More details on vigil logistics and COVID safety measures if you wish to attend at the rock to be announced in the coming days. Please be sure to check back for the required guidelines.

Mar
26
Fri
Anti-Asian Racism Online Forum
Mar 26 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

An online forum in solidarity with members of Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) communities:

The racist violence directed against Asian Pacific Islander Desi American communities has
a long history and the recent killings in Georgia are a reminder of the continuing cruel
legacy of anti-Asian policies put in place in the 19th and 20th centuries. The previous US
the administration gave license to the racist and sexist violence of the shooter, whose actions
reflect the ugly attitudes that persist in contemporary US politics and culture.

As scholars and students committed to anti-racism, equity, and justice, we are coming together to challenge the racist discourse on COVID 19 and the growing number of anti-Asian hate crimes in the US. Come hear MSU faculty address these issues.

Speakers:
Siddharth Chandra, Yen-Hwei Lin, Josh Yumibe, Hui-Ling Malone, Abhishek Narula, Sheng-mei Ma, and Naoko Wake.

The event has been organized by the Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities program, in partnership with the Asian Studies Center and Asian Pacific American Studies Program, and is sponsored by the College of Arts and Letters.

Register here: Webinar Registration – Zoom

Apr
9
Fri
Spartan Skin @ MSU Union Art Gallery
Apr 9 @ 12:00 pm – May 21 @ 5:00 pm
Spartan Skin @ MSU Union Art Gallery | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

SPARTAN SKIN

Young Joon Kwak | April 9 – May 21, 2021

Guarded on game day and integral to graduation photographs, the bronze cast of Leonard Jungwirth’s 1945 Spartan statue is the central symbol of Michigan State University.  The Spartan is an exemplary body, an icon of race, gender, and physical fitness that reflects the university’s ideal virtues of tenacity and will. Arriving at MSU in the wake of a national reckoning with white supremacy that often used debate about historical monuments as a proxy for broader questions of justice, 2020-21 Artist-in-Residence in Critical Race Studies Young Joon Kwak models a different approach to public art. The artist takes a recuperative attitude toward the Spartan statue, while opening the symbol to careful consideration. What does it mean, Kwak’s work asks, to identify a university campus that reflects our diverse society with any one icon?

Having made molds of portions of the statue’s exterior, Kwak created sculptures in cold-cast metals that remake the Spartan’s skin. The artist lavishes attention on the statue’s surface, preserving details that show evidence of Jungwirth’s hand and draw attention to subtle fan interactions. Kwak’s sculptures include impressions left by the pennies glued to the statue by athletes seeking good luck. Surrounding the casts are a series of monumental prints made from the molds, in which the Spartan’s body deviates further from his original form. Presented in fragments, and in works that demand contemplation, Kwak provides a site for careful reconsideration of the meaning of the Spartan. Spartan Skin opens to the public on Friday, April 9 beginning at 12 pm at the MSU Union Art Gallery.

Young Joon Kwak (b. 1984 in Queens, NY) is the 2020 – 2021 Artist-in-Residence in Critical Race Studies at Michigan State University. Kwak is a multi-disciplinary artist based in Los Angeles, CA, and Lansing, MI, who primarily uses sculpture, performance, video, and community-based collaborations to reimagine bodies and the power structures that govern our everyday lives as mutable and permeable sites of agency. Kwak is the lead performer in the electronic-dance-noise band Xina Xurner, and the founder of Mutant Salon, a roving platform for collaborative installations and performances with their queer/trans/POC/mutant community.

Creative Arts Activities (day one)
Apr 9 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Apr
16
Fri
Creative Arts Activities (day two)
Apr 16 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm