EVENTS

Calendar

Nov
12
Tue
Speaker: Lihi Lahat “Time & Policy: Time Uses, Time Preferences, and Policy Perceptions in Israel” @ South Kedzie Hall S-104
Nov 12 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Speaker: Lihi Lahat  "Time & Policy:  Time Uses, Time Preferences, and Policy Perceptions in Israel" @ South Kedzie Hall S-104

TIME & POLICY: Time Uses, Time Preferences, and Policy Perceptions In Israel

Time is one of our most essential resources. While researchers from various disciplines have studied time, less attention has been paid to the connection between time and public policy. The current study explores four questions:
1) How does the Israeli public spend their time, vis-à-vis four kinds of time: sleep, work, care time and personal time?
2) What are their preferences regarding the use of time in these four categories?
3) What is the public support for different policy alternatives that affect different uses of time?
4) Is there a connection between the uses of time, preferences regarding the uses of time and policy alternatives?

We found a connection between the way people use their time, want to use their time and their policy preferences.

Speaker: Dr. Lihi Lahat is a senior lecturer in the Department of Administration & Public Policy at Sapir Academic College.

Her papers have been published in journals such as Policy Sciences, Social Policy & Administration, International Review of Administrative
Sciences and Poverty & Public Policy. Her areas of research are policymakers’ perceptions of poverty, the regulation of personal social services, the trust and well-being of public officials, uses of time and policy, and collaborative governance.

Dr. Lahat is sponsered by the Israel Institute

Presented by:

The Michael and Elaine Serling Institute for Jewish Studies and Modern Israel

Co-sponsored by:

James Madison College

College of Arts & Letters

Department of Political Science

Residential College in the Arts & Humanities

Asian Studies Center

 

Nov
15
Fri
GSAH Global Perspectives Series – Symposium @ College of Law Castle Board Room
Nov 15 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
GSAH Global Perspectives Series - Symposium @ College of Law Castle Board Room | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

10:00am – Symposium, “Toward an Expansive Definition of Genocide” – John Cox, UNC Charlotte

11:00am – “Can the Spanish Genocide Speak?” – Scott Boehm, Michigan State University

12:00pm – Roundtable Discussion

  • Almudena Carracedo, Film Director
  • John Cox, UNC Charlotte
  • Sebastiaan Faber, Oberlin College
  • Cristina Moreiras-Menor, University of Michigan
  • Joseba Gabilonda, Michigan State University
Film screening: The Silence of Others – GSAH Symposium @ B122 Wells Hall
Nov 15 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Nov
18
Mon
Shinto in Contemporary Japan: From Basic Teachings to Anime @ Room 303 International Center
Nov 18 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Shinto in Contemporary Japan: From Basic Teachings to Anime @ Room 303 International Center | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Shinto in Contemporary Japan: From Basic Teachings to Anime

From core principles to the ways Shinto is practiced today, this talk will address shrines for sports, fertility and protection from STDs, appropriation by popular culture (such as in anime and advertisements), and new spirituality movements including the power spot boom.

 

Dr. Stephen Covell

Chair of the Department of Comparative Religion and the Mary Meader Professor of Comparative Religion at Western Michigan University. Dr. Covell was the founding director of WMU’s Soga Japan Center and has published widely on Buddhism and other Japanese religious topics.

 

 

Sponsored by the Center for Integrative Studies in the Arts and Humanities, IAH Connecting Pedagogy and Practice Fund, Department of Religious Studies, Asian Studies Center, and MSU Japan Council.

Annual Kessler film: “Who Will Write Our History” @ MSU Library Green Room (4th Floor West)
Nov 18 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Annual Kessler film:  "Who Will Write Our History" @ MSU Library Green Room (4th Floor West)

Annual Kessler film: “Who Will Write Our History?

“In November 1940, days after the Nazis sealed 450,000 Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto, a secret band of journalists, scholars and community leaders decided to fight back. Led by historian Emanuel Ringelblum and known by the code name Oyneg Shabes, this clandestine group vowed to defeat Nazi lies and propaganda not with guns or fists but with pen and paper. Now, for the first time, their story is told as a feature documentary.

Written, produced and directed by Roberta Grossman and executive produced by Nancy Spielberg, Who Will Write Our History mixes the writings of the Oyneg Shabes archive with new interviews, rarely seen footage and stunning dramatizations to transport us inside the Ghetto and the lives of these courageous resistance fighters. They defied their murderous enemy with the ultimate weapon – the truth – and risked everything so that their archive would survive the war, even if they did not.”

Professor Amy Simon will be introducing the film and leading a discussion of it afterwards.

Presented by:

The Michael and Elaine Serling Institute for Jewish Studies and Modern Israel

Co-sponsors

Department of Religious Studies

College of Arts & Letters

James Madison College

Department of History

Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Residential College in the Arts and Humanities

 

Nov
25
Mon
Film and Discussion: Senior Moments @ Wells Hall B-122
Nov 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Film and Discussion: Senior Moments @ Wells Hall B-122

 

Film and Discussion

Senior Moments

 

Tamar Kay will introduce her film Senior Moments and lead a discussion after the screening. Funny, witty, bold and revealing, the creators of “Senior Moments” document intimate meetings with 10 resilient active elderly folks surviving old age with a vengeance. It cohesively samples a cultural variety of personalities in modern-day Israel and provides an inspiring outlook on what it means to be old this day and age.

Directed By: Tamar Kay & Yair Agmon, 2018

 

Tamar Kay graduated from the Sam Spiegel Film & Television School in Jerusalem in 2015. “Unchained,” an Israeli TV drama (12 episodes, 40 mins each) Tamar created with Yossi Madmoni & David Ofek, will have its premiere in November 2019, at the Israeli KAAN channel. She is a two-time Israeli Academy Award nominee.

The Mute’s House, which she directed and co-produced was shortlisted for the 2017 Best Short Documentary Academy Award (Oscars) and screened internationally and at MSU, winning numerous awards in prestigious festivals. Tamar edited the TV series, “Arik Einstein: A Standard Love Song”, which won the Israeli Emmy for Best Documentary TV Series (2018).

 

Feb
6
Thu
Yiddish Between Worlds @ Wells Hall, B-342
Feb 6 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Yiddish Between Worlds @ Wells Hall, B-342 | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Dr. Margot B. Valles

Dr. Dov-Ber Kerler, Dr. Jack Kugelmass and Dr. Eli Rosenblatt

Dr. Margot B. Valles (MSU) will chair a panel bringing together three scholars of Yiddish who are 2019-2020 Frankel Institute Fellows exploring the theme of “Yiddish Matters” at the University of Michigan. Dr. Dov-Ber Kerler (Dr. Alice Field Cohn Chair in Yiddish Studies at Indiana University) is a contemporary Yiddish poet and ethnographer who is currently exploring the relationship between Yiddish poetry and the status of Yiddish today. Dr. Jack Kugelmass (Professor of Anthropology and the Melton Legislative Professor at the University of Florida) is a cultural anthropologist who studies Jewish identity and ethnography, particularly through travel narratives. Dr. Eli Rosenblatt (Northwestern University) works on racial politics and Ashkenazi identity through Yiddish literature. Together the panelists will explore Yiddish writing and culture in diverse contexts. 

Feb
10
Mon
Holocaust by Bullets: Model for the Modern Genocide @ The Kellogg Center Auditorium
Feb 10 @ 7:00 pm
Holocaust by Bullets: Model for the Modern Genocide @ The Kellogg Center Auditorium | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Father Patrick Desbois

Meticulous Nazi records of Jews killed in the death camps identify fewer than half of the Holocaust’s victims. When, where and how were the other victims killed? Father Patrick Desbois, Founder and President of Yahad – In Unum and Braman Endowed Professor of the Practice of the Forensic Study of the Holocaust at the Center for Jewish Civilization of Georgetown University, has sought and found the answers to these questions.

In 2004, he founded Yahad – In Unum (“Together in One”) whose original charter was documenting the evidence of the Holocaust in Eastern Europe. By studying the archives and interviewing the eyewitnesses to the 75-year-old crime of the Holocaust, Father Desbois and his team were able to shed light on a forgotten mechanism in Hitler’s killing machine – the Einsatzgruppen, mobile killing squads that rounded up Jews by the thousands and shot them dead in towns and villages across Eastern Europe.

Yahad-In Unum’s relentless study and research into the “Holocaust by Bullets” has revealed chilling parallels between the Nazi atrocities and those committed today by ISIS – particularly in its murder and enslavement of Yazidis. For the last several years, Father Desbois and his team have been gathering testimony from the survivors of those crimes in Northern Iraq. They have also established centers for children and women in refugee camps to help former captives’ transition back into society.

 

Feb
17
Mon
Guest Speaker: Dr. Devin E. Naar @ Kellogg Conference Center
Feb 17 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Guest Speaker: Dr. Devin E. Naar @ Kellogg Conference Center | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

The Michael and Elaine Serling Institute for Jewish Studies and Modern Israel presents

Between the Ottoman Empire and Modern Greece: The Fate of Salonica ‘Jerusalem of the Balkans’

Dr. Devin E. Naar, University of Wisconsin

From 1492 until the twentieth century, the city of Salonica–once part of the Ottoman Empire and today the second biggest city in Greece– was home to the largest community of Ladinospeaking Sephardic Jews in the world. This talk focuses on how this once-thriving Jewish community grappled with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the rise of modern Greece prior to the devastation of the Holocaust. Dr. Devin E. Naar is Isaac Alhadeff Professor of Sephardic Studies and Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies at the University of Washington. His book, Jewish Salonica: Between the Ottoman Empire and Modern Greece, won a National Jewish Book Award and the grand prize from the Modern Greek Studies Association.

Monday, February 17, 8:00-9:30 PM followed by reception

The Kellogg Center Auditorium

Co- sponsors: James Madison College, the College of Arts and Letters, College of Social Science, Residential College in the Arts and Humanities, Department of History.

Dr. Devin E. Naar  event flyer