EVENTS

Calendar

Feb
23
Tue
Betting on Democracy: the Faith of an American Jewish Pragmatist @ Zoom
Feb 23 @ 7:00 pm
Betting on Democracy: the Faith of an American Jewish Pragmatist @ Zoom | Michigan | United States
Betting on Democracy: the Faith of an American Jewish Pragmatist with Rabbi Matthew Kaufman
In this significant American political moment, this presentation on the thought of American Jewish philosopher Horace M. Kallen is a timely exploration of his unique and creative conception of democracy as a religion. As we now grapple with understanding what America is and who we are as a people, Kallen’s ideas resonate as a sounding board for new debates on the viability of cooperative unity as the operative condition of American society.
Mar
17
Wed
Classes with CAL 2021 – Innovations in Teaching in the Arts and Humanities @ Zoom
Mar 17 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

CLASSES with CAL SPRING 2021

Innovations in Teaching in the Arts and Humanities

Take time during Covid to get back in Class! Please join us for a night of innovative thinking with some of the College of Arts and Letter’s finest. All staff, faculty, retirees, friends, and family are welcome!

Date: March 17th from 6:00-8:00

RSVP HERE

6:10-6:35 Talk #1 “The science and art of wellbeing: Integrating student wellness into CAL courses” with Dr. John Ritz; College of Arts and Letters Inaugural Director of Student Wellness

Jon Ritz, WRAC faculty member and CAL’s new Director of Student Wellness, will discuss CAL’s new effort to integrate wellness concepts and practices into its undergraduate learning goals, with a focus on mindfulness, creativity, and resilience. Jon will provide a brief overview of the evidence-based approach that undergirds the effort and how it will be delivered to students through cocurricular activities and direct integration in CAL courses. He will also touch on ways that a wellness-infused curriculum can help reinvigorate the arts and humanities as sites of undergraduate education.

6:35- 7:00 PM Talk #2 “It is never too Late to Learn a Language” with Sandhya Shanker; Academic Specialist at the Center for Language Teaching Advancement

In a globalized world, learning a language is not only useful when traveling but also boosts brain power. Learning a language as an adult enhances the ability to multitask, sharpens the mind and improves memory. The MSU Community Language School offers online language classes for adults with sessions in the fall, spring and summer. Information will be shared about our program offerings as well as a short taste of our online program experience.

7:00-7:40 Talk #3 “Evolving Pathways to Social Justice in the Arts and Humanities: Creativity in the Academic Class” with Julian Chambliss, Nancy DeJoy, and Natalie Phillips, CO-PIs on an Andrew Mellon Foundation Just Futures Grant.

In this presentation Chambliss, DeJoy, and Phillips discuss how centering creativity as opening paths to social justice encourages us to see creativity as central to teaching and learning in the humanities. Using the class work that inspired their Mellon Foundation Just Futures grant, the three will discuss how creativity is vital to inclusive curricula and how it expands our opportunities for community partnerships to inform our teaching.

Student Spotlight 7:40-7:55

RSVP HERE

Mar
18
Thu
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom
Mar 18 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom

Stephanie Kerschbaum

Title: “Signs of Disability in the Writing Center”

RSVP LINK

Abstract: Where and how and when does disability emerge in the writing center? In this talk, Stephanie Kerschbaum will briefly discuss her concept of “signs of disability” and how it can usefully inform the way we approach our work in the writing center. Signs of disability are material-discursive-rhetorical cues that point to the presence of disability in some way, shape or form. One way for writing center staff and tutors to orient to these signs is to think about the stories we tell about our experiences and what those stories might reveal about where we are putting our attention (or not putting it). Attendees will have a chance to do some freewriting and reflection during the talk.

Bio: Stephanie L. Kerschbaum is currently Associate Professor of English at the University of Delaware, and beginning July 1, 2021, she will be Associate Professor and Director of the Expository Writing Program at the University of Washington. Her first book, Toward a New Rhetoric of Difference, won the 2015 CCCC Advancement of Knowledge Book Award and she is the co-editor of Negotiating Disability: Disclosure and Higher Education. Her work has appeared in a range of journals and collections, and she’s currently at work on a book called Signs of Disability focused on how disability becomes available for noticing in everyday encounters. She can be reached at kersch.uw@gmail.com and loves to hear about all kinds of signs of disability from other people.

RSVP LINK

Mar
23
Tue
Finifter Panel on The Holocaust in Greece @ Zoom
Mar 23 @ 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Finifter Panel on The Holocaust in Greece @ Zoom

The College of Arts and Letters Jewish Studies Presents:

Finifter Panel on The Holocaust in Greece

REGISTER HERE

Hear from three international historians, Dr. Andrew Apostolou, Dr. Leon Saltiel, and Dr. Giorgos Antoniou as they cover “The Thirst Perspective on the Holocaust: Non-Jews and the German Murder of their Jewish Neighbors,” “A City Against its Citizens?,” and “Revisiting Bystanders Rescuers and Collaborators: Social Distancing and Social Networks in Thessaloniki before and during the Holocaust.”