EVENTS

Calendar

May
16
Tue
CALICO Conf. 2017 @ Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ
May 16 – May 20 all-day

calico

Join us for the Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium, which will be in Flagstaff, Arizona, at Northern Arizona University!

Jun
1
Thu
MAFLT Fall Admission Deadline @ Wells Hall
Jun 1 all-day
MAFLT Fall Admission Deadline @ Wells Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Are you thinking about pursuing a graduate degree in language teaching? Consider applying to our 100% online program. Our fall admission deadline is June 1st. View our admission requirements here: http://maflt.cal.msu.edu/apply/

Want to try a course or two? You can enroll in MAFLT courses as a Graduate Lifelong Education student. You must have a BA or BS to obtain Graduate Lifelong Education student status. To apply for Graduate Lifelong Education student status, complete the easy online Lifelong Education Application (https://reg.msu.edu/ROInfo/EnrReg/LifelongEducation.aspx). You may be able to transfer up to 9 credits received as a MSU Graduate Lifelong Education student into the MAFLT Program’s credit requirements if you are later accepted into the MAFLT Program. Tuition costs may be different for students who enroll in courses this way.

Aug
30
Wed
European Second Language Association Conference 2017 @ University of Reading, UK
Aug 30 – Sep 2 all-day

The Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism at the University of Reading is delighted to welcome you all to EuroSLA 27 from 30th August until 2nd September, 2017 in Reading, UK.

 

Sep
13
Wed
Surviving technology: Finding your way with so many choices @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall
Sep 13 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Surviving technology: Finding your way with so many choices @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall  | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Presenter: Dr. Dustin DeFelice

In teaching today, we face an overwhelming number of choices in using technology to motivate, assess and engage our learners. In many cases, we just start feeling comfortable with the latest app, gadget or device when another one appears on the market. What is a teacher to do? Using a set of principles, teachers can find ways of surviving this technology onslaught and make smart, practical choices for their own classroom while maintaining their own sanity.

Sep
20
Wed
Teaching reading and writing through genres in lower-level language classes @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall
Sep 20 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Teaching reading and writing through genres in lower-level language classes @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall

Presenter: Dr. Charlene Polio

In this session, I will discuss the rationale for using real-life genres in beginning language classes as a way to move beyond the textbook for reading and beyond the five-paragraph essay or “what I did on the weekend” type assignments for writing.  I will also show how to focus on the organization and language of specific genres and how to scaffold students through understanding and writing real-life genres.  All of the examples will be suited to lower-levels.

Sep
27
Wed
Writing beyond the essay: Creating anthologies in the literature and culture classroom @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall
Sep 27 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Writing beyond the essay: Creating anthologies in the literature and culture classroom @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall

Presenter: Dr. Katie McEwen

Tired of writing the same old essay assignments? Anthologies give students the opportunity to work with literature hands on, as they grapple with issues of selection, collection, and organization.

Sep
29
Fri
CeLTA Signature Speaker Series Workshop: Creating more authentic oral test constructs and tasks @ B342 Wells Hall
Sep 29 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am
CeLTA Signature Speaker Series Workshop: Creating more authentic oral test constructs and tasks @ B342 Wells Hall

Presenter: Dr. Gary Ockey

A four skills, listening, reading, writing, and speaking, approach to assessing and reporting language ability has been prevalent for decades. More recently, however, a number of factors have led to the need to reconsider this paradigm. Possibly the most important of these factors is the move toward the use of more authentic language test tasks, ones that have characteristics which correspond to those of a language use task that test takers might be expected to complete in a real world context. This move toward authentic tasks has had the knock-on effect of an increased use of interactive and integrated test tasks, which may measure constructs of language ability that do not align with the four skills paradigm.

In this workshop, the interactive integrated tasks used in the Iowa State English Placement Test (https://apling.engl.iastate.edu/english-placement-test) will be introduced to participants, who will then have an opportunity to create similar tasks based on their own contexts. The task creation will be embedded in a construct (Bachman and Palmer, 2010) and instructional validity (Pellegrino, DiBello, & Goldman 2016) framework for test development. The workshop will conclude with discussion of the use of spoken dialog systems acting as a conversational partner to make interactive tasks more feasible.

 

Gary Ockey, (M.A., University of Utah, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) is an Associate Professor at Iowa State University. He investigates second language assessments, with a focus on the use of technology and quantitative methods to better measure oral communication (listening and speaking). He recently led the development of the Iowa State University oral communication placement test, an example of a test which combines strengths of humans and computers for test delivery and scoring. His co-authored book: Emerging issues in the assessment of second language listening, is expected to be published by John Benjamins in 2018. He has published in various journals, including Applied Linguistics, Language Learning, Language Assessment Quarterly,Language Testing, and Modern Language Journal. He has served as the Editor of the TOEFL Research Report Series, and is currently an associate editor of Language Assessment Quarterly.

CeLTA Signature Speaker Series Talk: Selecting speakers with “appropriate” speech varieties for an L2 listening assessment @ B342 Wells Hall
Sep 29 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
CeLTA Signature Speaker Series Talk: Selecting speakers with “appropriate” speech varieties for an L2 listening assessment @ B342 Wells Hall

Presenter: Dr. Gary Ockey

Concerns about the need for assessing multidialectal listening skills for global contexts are becoming increasingly prevalent. However, the inclusion of speakers on listening assessments who have diverse speech varieties may threaten test fairness because test takers’ listening could be affected differently depending on their experience with certain speech varieties. To shed some light on this conundrum, this study aimed to determine the degree to which strength of accent can be measured reliably and the extent to which accent strength and familiarity affect comprehension on a test of L2 listening.  

In stage one of the study, a strength of accent scale was developed. After numerous tryouts of the scale and resulting revisions, a study was conducted to investigate its reliability. Twenty English speakers, two of whom were believed to have accents representative of the local speech variety (Standard American English) and 18 of whom were believed to have accents that differed from the local speech variety, were recorded giving short lectures. Two 20-second audio clips for each of the speakers were taken from the lectures. These 40 audio clips were then played to 69 L1 and 31 L2 listeners. The listeners used the strength of accent scale to judge each of the audio clips. A Many-Facet Rasch Measurement analysis indicated that the Strength of Accent scale led to ratings which distinguished the various speakers, the two different speech segments led to similar estimates of strength of accent, and L2 listeners were slightly harsher and more variable in their strength of accent judgements than L1 listeners.

In the second stage of the study, the accent scale developed in stage one was used to select one US, four Australian, and four British English speakers of English. TOEFL test takers (N = 21,726) were randomly assigned to listen to a common lecture given by one of the nine selected speakers, and respond to six comprehension items and a survey designed to assess their familiarity with various accents. The results suggest that strength of accent and familiarity do affect listening comprehension, and these factors affect comprehension even with quite light accents.

 

Reception to follow

 

Gary Ockey, (M.A., University of Utah, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) is an Associate Professor at Iowa State University. He investigates second language assessments, with a focus on the use of technology and quantitative methods to better measure oral communication (listening and speaking). He recently led the development of the Iowa State University oral communication placement test, an example of a test which combines strengths of humans and computers for test delivery and scoring. His co-authored book: Emerging issues in the assessment of second language listening, is expected to be published by John Benjamins in 2018. He has published in various journals, including Applied Linguistics, Language Learning, Language Assessment Quarterly,Language Testing, and Modern Language Journal. He has served as the Editor of the TOEFL Research Report Series, and is currently an associate editor of Language Assessment Quarterly.

Oct
4
Wed
Effective writing: Who decides? @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall
Oct 4 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Effective writing: Who decides? @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall

Presenter: Carol Arnold

The definition of effective writing depends on purpose, audience, medium used, and is always discipline specific.  Helping students move away from memorized structures and phrases is key.  Four key principles that will be discussed are: content relevance, content development, learning to join a conversation, and how to edit for grammar.

Oct
11
Wed
Meet the CeLTA Fellows! @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall
Oct 11 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Meet the CeLTA Fellows! @ CeLTA B135 Wells Hall

Come meet our 2017-2018 CeLTA Fellows and learn about their projects.

  • Aline Godfroid – Measuring ESL Learners’ Language Profiles: An Individual Differences Approach
  • Zarema Kumakhova and Shannon Spasova – Authentic Reading Texts from Elementary to Advanced
  • Dmitrii Pastushenkov – Teaching Materials for Online Tutoring Sessions: IELTS/TOEFL Preparation and Transition to Business
  • Anne Violin-Wigent – Liaisons in French: What Are Students Truly Learning in Class?