EVENTS

Calendar

Feb
27
Mon
Japanese Twitterature & End of the World @ 228 Erickson Hall
Feb 27 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Japanese Twitterature & End of the World @ 228 Erickson Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Hard Rain Falling: Japanese Twitterature and the End of the World

This talk examines the history of the Twitter novel in Japan and the use of that form in the immediate aftermath of the triple disasters of March 11, 2011. When the earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima catastrophes struck, telephone connections were disrupted and mainstream media failed to provide the immediate news citizens craved. So many turned to social media for facts streaming from the disasters, while a subset of the population took solace in fiction and poetry posted on those same venues. This talk examines the ways the short, micro, or flash fiction posted on twitter helped readers cope with the trauma, understand the events, and re-imagine possible futures.

Reception to follow.

Jonathan E. Abel is an Associate Professor of Asian Studies and Comparative Literature at Penn State University. His recent work looks at the history of new media in Japan in order to examine the interrelations of representations and reality.

Sponsors and funding support by: Asian Studies Center, Japan Foundation of New York

Apr
21
Fri
“(Re) Dress: Outfitting Controversy” Exhibit Opening @ MSU Union Gallery, 2nd Floor
Apr 21 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
"(Re) Dress: Outfitting Controversy" Exhibit Opening @ MSU Union Gallery, 2nd Floor | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Students in Susan Bandes’s Curatorial Practices course have organized the exhibition (Re) Dress: Outfitting Controversy. It will be on view from April 21-April 28, 2017 in the MSU Union Gallery, 2nd Floor on the MSU campus. Opening hours are Monday- Thursday, noon-5 p.m; Friday, noon- 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The opening reception is on April 21, 6:00-8:00 p.m.

The exhibition explores a variety of ways in which dress defines and gives identify to a person or group of people across the globe. It features attire and images of dress from the Broad Art Museum and the MSU Museum collections dating from the late 19th century to the present day and from a variety of cultures. They are used to explore how dress can form identity wheter it is chosen or imposed and how it affects changing perceptions of the wearer. From hats to shoes, star-spangled and striped hippie jeans to a WWI uniform, the exhibition explores dress as implied or explicit controversy.

The 25 curators of this exhibition come from diverse backgrounds and span a variety of majors including art, art history, anthropology, history, media information and advertising. From these different perspectives, they came together to think about the theme in new ways.

Feb
4
Thu
Jay Dolmage Lecture @ Zoom
Feb 4 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Jay Dolmage Lecture @ Zoom

Jay Dolmage: Ableism, Access, and Inclusion: Disability in Higher Education Before, During and After Covid-19.

 

In this workshop, we will collaborate to address the ableist attitudes, policies, and practices that are built into higher education. We will also interrogate the minimal and temporary means we have been given to address inequities, and the cost such an approach has for disabled students and faculty. We will explore our own ableist biases, apologies and defenses in an effort to build tools for a much more accessible future at Michigan State, while we also examine how disability has been situated in higher education before, during and (someday) after Covid-19.

RSVP Link

Feb
17
Wed
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom
Feb 17 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom

Margaret Price: Everyday Survival and Collective Action: What We Can Learn from Disabled Faculty in a Time of Unwellness

The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has raised startling questions about everyday life—for example, “How is it possible that I am required to do a full-time job while also providing full-time care for my family?” or “How can I negotiate questions of ‘safety’ with my co-workers, my community, even my closest loved ones?” These questions surged into the limelight in 2020, yet few realize that they were already active topics of conversation in small, interdependent communities of disabled, BIPOC, queer, and otherwise marginalized people. In this talk, Margaret Price draws upon data from a survey and interview study with disabled faculty (https://margaretprice.wordpress.com/disabled-faculty-study) to highlight themes such as “time,” “cost,” “technology,” and “accountability.” These themes not only teach us more about the everyday lives and strategies of disabled faculty members, but also demonstrate that all participants in higher education will benefit from a cultural shift toward shared accountability and interdependent forms of care.

Click here to RSVP

Feb
24
Wed
A Conversation with CAL – AAAS @ Zoom
Feb 24 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
A Conversation with CAL - AAAS @ Zoom

“A Visionary New Build: The Department of African American and African Studies”

Presented by Tamura Lomax, Ph.D., and Ruth Nicole Brown, Ph.D., of the Department of African American and African Studies

Description: In this episode of Conversations with CAL, Dr. Ruth Nicole Brown and Dr. Tamura Lomax reveal their experiences joining MSU during a global pandemic and discuss the visionary new build of the Department of African American and African Studies.

RSVP LINK: https://msu.zoom.us/s/96416030134