EVENTS

Calendar

Jul
27
Fri
DRAWN TO PRINT National Juried Exhibition @ (SCENE) Metrospace
Jul 27 – Aug 31 all-day
DRAWN TO PRINT National Juried Exhibition @ (SCENE) Metrospace | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

DRAWN TO PRINT

A national juried exhibition of drawning and printmaking and everything inbetween.

July 27 – August 31, 2018

Reception July 27, 6-8PM

This exhibition is the result of a national call and features works on paper that explore the ways in which the diverse and inclusive mediums of drawing and printmaking converge and are completely separate.

The path followed by a brayer can begin with a pencil, a mouse, a cut, or a maybe a stencil. There is no limit to the ideas that can be explored through drawing or printmaking. The presence of the artist in these processes can be at the forefront or separated by many layers of information. Surfaces can be additive or subtractive. Lines and forms can be ink, paint, graphite, thread, a cut or a tear. The work in this exhibition meets with the act of one material being pulled across the surface of another.

This exhibition features work from:

CONNOR ACHESON
DANIEL ALYIM
BRANDIN BARÓN
CURTIS BARTONE
ANNE BEIDLER
PATRICIA BENDER
SUZIE BUCHHOLZ
ANTONIO CARDOSO
EVAN CHRISTOPHERSON
DUSTIN CLARK
AMANDA COE
ANDREW DECAEN
HECTOR DEL CAMPO
SUZANNE DITTENBER
MATT DRISSEL
EVAN FERRARO
CYNDI FORD
SARAH HEYWARD
TRAVIS JANSSEN
JOHN JUDGE
CAROL MYERS
JOSH NEWTH
KATHLEEN ROGERS
MARK ROSPENDA
DIANE STAVER
SALLY SCHLUTER TARDELLA
BRUCE THAYER
OLIVIA TIMMONS
MARGI WEIR
JANE ZICH

Nov
15
Thu
“Do Computers Participate in Meaning-Making?” – N. Katherine Hayles @ Green Room (Main Library)
Nov 15 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
"Do Computers Participate in Meaning-Making?" - N. Katherine Hayles @ Green Room (Main Library) | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Biosemiotics, as developed by Jesper Hoffmeyer, Wendy Wheeler, Terence Deacon and others, has made a convincing case that all lifeforms participate in the exchange, interpretation, and circulation of meanings, even for organisms that do not have brains or central nervous systems.  However, Hoffmeyer, Wheeler and Deacon all insist that computers do not participate in the circulation and interpretation of meanings through sign exchanges, an increasingly problematic position given the complexity of contemporary networked and programmed machines.  This talk will critically examine the reasons given by biosemioticians for excluding machines and make the contrary argument that computers do indeed generate, interpret, and circulate meanings.  The implications of this claim for ethical theories will also be explored.

Sara Ramirez @ MSU Wells Hall B342
Nov 15 @ 5:30 pm

Please Join us for the ENG MUSE Program x CLS Guest Lecture by 

Dr. Sara Ramírez, Texas State University

Thursday November 15, 2018 

5:30-7:00pm | Wells Hall B-342

“Reassembling Subjects of Trauma: Coyolxauhqui’s New Plight in Virginia Grise’s blu”  

Feb
23
Sat
Comics Forum Keynote Scholar Lecture DR QIANA WHITTED @ MSU Library, 3rd Floor Beal Room
Feb 23 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Comics Forum Keynote Scholar Lecture DR QIANA WHITTED @ MSU Library, 3rd Floor Beal Room | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

DR QIANA WHITTED / FEBRUARY 23 / MSU LIBRARY BEAL ROOM / 12PM                                                                               

Dr. Qiana Whitted teaches at USC, her research focuses on African-American literary studies and American comic books. Her most recently published articles and book chapters explore race, genre, and comics in representations of historical figures such as Nat Turner, Stagger Lee, and Emmett Till. Her forthcoming book on race and social protest in 1950s EC comics will be published in 2019. Whitted is the 2019 Comics Forum Scholar Keynote Speaker.

Apr
11
Thu
Race, Pedagogy, and Lit*: Dr. Beverly Guy-Sheftall @ Wells Hall B-243
Apr 11 @ 4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Race, Pedagogy, and Lit*: Dr. Beverly Guy-Sheftall @ Wells Hall B-243 | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Dr. Guy-Sheftall, previous President of the National Women’s Studies Association, has published a number of texts within African American and Women’s Studies which include the first anthology on Black women’s literature, Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature (Doubleday, 1979). She has been involved in a number of advocacy organizations which include the National Black Women’s Health Project, the National Council for Research on Women, and the National Coalition of 100 Black Women. As Director of Spelman’s Women’s Center, she has also been involved with student activism around a broad range of social justice issues, including reproductive rights and violence against women. At Emory University’s Institute for Women’s Studies and Spelman College, she teaches women’s studies courses that center feminist theory and global Black Feminisms.

Oct
11
Fri
C4I Lecture–Megan Halpern @ Spartan Room at International Ctr.
Oct 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
C4I Lecture--Megan Halpern @ Spartan Room at International Ctr. | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Science as Experience: A New Approach to Science Communication    

Megan Halpern draws on Dewey’s theory of aesthetic experience to develop a model that can reshape how we research, practice, and evaluate science communication. Drawing on her work in art-science collaboration and design-inspired public engagement with science and technology, Halpern illustrates three principles of her model. First, experiences are cumulative rather than transformative, second, that context shapes experiences; and third, that ultimately, audiences have agency in shaping the meanings they draw from their interactions with scientific content. Finally, Halpern offers insights into how to develop projects from an experience perspective.

Coffee and Cookies provided.

Plan to stay after the lecture for additional coffee and networking time.

Oct
17
Thu
MUSE Lecture: Omaris Z. Zamora @ Wells Hall B243
Oct 17 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
MUSE Lecture: Omaris Z. Zamora @ Wells Hall B243 | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

The Department of English MUSE Scholars Program presents a lecture by Dr. Omaris Z. Zamora, “Delectable Complicities From El Ni’ E: AfroLatinx Feminisms of Cardi B & La Bella Chanel.” Dr. Zamora is assistant professor of Afro-Latinx Studies at Rutgers University. Her book project, AfroLatina (Trance)formations: Poetics of Black Embodied Archives and Feminist Epistemologies, engages the theoretical formation of AfroLatina feminist epistemologies through an analysis of transnational Dominican women’s narratives in literature and performance. As a spoken-word poet she fuses her poetry with her scholarly work as a way of contributing to a black poetic approach to literature and cultural studies.

Please join us Thursday, October 17th at 4:30pm in Wells Hall room B243.

Oct
18
Fri
MUSE Scholars Daily Panels @ Wells Hall B342
Oct 18 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
MUSE Scholars Daily Panels @ Wells Hall B342 | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Join the MUSE scholars program for daily public panels. Presenters on Friday, 10/18 include:

  • Gabriella Adriana Davis: “Ecuador is Black: Afro-Ecuadorian Literary Resistance in Drums Under My Skin
  • Havannah Chau Ngoc Tran: “Reading Mythology in Ocean Vuong’s Night Sky With Exit Wounds through ‘Just Memory’
  • Agnes Sastre-Rivera: “Colonial Space, Colonized Bodies and Religions: A Study of Colonial Trauma in Nigel Thomas’ Return to Arcadia and Shani Mooto’s Cereus Blooms at Night
  • Dr. Zarena Aslami: “Victorian Afghanistan and the Poetics of Marginal Sovereignty”
  • Dr. Sheila Marie Contreras “Between Settlers: Race, Gender and the Anglo/Mexican land grab in US popular culture“”

 

 

Oct
19
Sat
MUSE Scholars Daily Panels @ Wells Hall B342
Oct 19 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
MUSE Scholars Daily Panels @ Wells Hall B342 | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Join the MUSE scholars program for daily public panels. Presenters on Saturday, 10/19 include:

  • Naajidah Correll: “Double Negative Discourse: On Black Icons and Public Despair”
  • Ariana Karina Costales Del Toro: “It Was Powerful Women All Along: Debunking Female Monsters in Nalo Hopkinson’s Brown Girl in the Ring
  • Ke’Shunta Faye Drake: “When (will) They see Us: Black Womanism, Me, Myself, and the Life and Times of Assata Shakur”
  • Jennifer Mojica Santana: “‘Soy Bandolero como el Míster Politiquero’: Tracing Sociopolitical Activism in Don Omar’s and Tego Calderón’s Reggaetón”
  • Dr. Tamara Butler: “Worn: Sartorial Politics and Artifacts”

 

 

Nov
7
Thu
Big10 Emerging Scholar Valerie O’Brien @ Wells Hall C607
Nov 7 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Big10 Emerging Scholar Valerie O’Brien @ Wells Hall C607 | Boone | North Carolina | United States

Please mark your calendars for the campus visit of Big10 Emerging Scholar Valerie O’Brien, visiting from the University of Illinois on November 7 and 8.

The Big 10 Emerging Scholars Program—now in its second year—seeks to provide a platform for the work of emerging graduate student scholars in Big10 Departments of English. Each year, we host a scholar from one of our peer institutions, and one MSU graduate student is selected as a visiting scholar in turn.

Valerie has research interests in disability studies and animal studies. She will be participating in the HIVES Research Workshop on Nov 7th, from 4-6pm in Wells C607. On Friday, November 8th, from 3-5pm, Valerie will give a talk to the Department in Wells B342. Please attend and support our efforts to mentor graduate students.

This talk examines J.M. Coetzee’s Foe, a retelling of Robinson Crusoe that I contend illuminates the linkages between autobiographical narration and Enlightenment conceptions of personhood. In Coetzee’s reimagining, the character Friday, Cruso(e)’s slave, is a disruptive, enigmatic figure, for although Defoe’s Friday masters English, Coetzee’s cannot speak at all because his tongue has been cut out; consequently, Friday’s untold life story—a “hole in the narrative”—becomes the central mystery on which the narrator and the novel itself become fixated. I investigate this preoccupation with Friday’s mutism in relation to the role of language—and autobiographical narration in particular—in historical distinctions of person from animal, distinctions particularly fraught for slaves and disabled subjects. My talk calls attention to what is troubling about historical uses of autobiography as a litmus test for social belonging, examining how slave narratives functioned as tests for personhood and how the practice of telling one’s life narrative may exclude disabled individuals. Reading the novel as part of a larger body of contemporary fiction that explores the limitations and possibilities of autobiographical narratives to convey experiences of disability and debility, I argue that Foe unsettles conceptions of personhood bound to a capacity for normative autobiographical narration.