EVENTS

Calendar

Feb
5
Wed
Ed Tech Brownbag: Speed Dating @ Wells B342
Feb 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Ed Tech Brownbag: Speed Dating @ Wells B342 | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Ed Tech Brown Bag #1: Speed Dating

Wed., Feb 5. 12:00-1:00pm. Wells Hall B342

ELC Ed Tech Specialist Austin Kaufmann will give a 2-minute Speed Dating pitch for each of his Ten Most Frequently Used Ed Tech Tools. Participants will note down which tools they are most interested in, and based on their top choices, Austin will create a semester schedule for smaller group trainings. (Feel free to bring your lunch!)

Nov
4
Wed
Locus: Intersections of Digital Technology and Gender Studies @ Zoom
Nov 4 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Locus: Intersections of Digital Technology and Gender Studies @ Zoom

This virtual Locus event will provide a collegial forum for scholars in any discipline to share research developments at any stage (including brainstorming, works in progress, and/or fully developed projects), as well as ideas and best practices for teaching. Presentations and conversation will cover a variety of topics specific to digital technologies and gender studies. Please join us!

Register at: https://forms.gle/gcTWRjxXNh8gfoQj7

Feb
24
Wed
A Conversation with CAL – AAAS @ Zoom
Feb 24 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
A Conversation with CAL - AAAS @ Zoom

“A Visionary New Build: The Department of African American and African Studies”

Presented by Tamura Lomax, Ph.D., and Ruth Nicole Brown, Ph.D., of the Department of African American and African Studies

Description: In this episode of Conversations with CAL, Dr. Ruth Nicole Brown and Dr. Tamura Lomax reveal their experiences joining MSU during a global pandemic and discuss the visionary new build of the Department of African American and African Studies.

RSVP LINK: https://msu.zoom.us/s/96416030134



									
Kelly Akashi Mutant Salon Talk Hosted by Young Joon Kwak @ Virtual on Zoom
Feb 24 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Kelly Akashi Mutant Salon Talk Hosted by Young Joon Kwak @ Virtual on Zoom

Kelly Akashi | February 24 | Virtual on Zoom | 4 PM EST

This event does not require pre-registration, if you are interested in joining our zoom webinar, please do so using the link and password below.

https://msu.zoom.us/j/97803340342 pw: mutants

Material tactility, its possibilities, limitations, and transformation form the core of Kelly Akashi’s practice. Originally trained in analog photography, traditional processes and the materiality of documents continue to inform and fuel her sculptural explorations. Working in a variety of media, such as wax, bronze, fire, glass, silicone, copper, and rope, Akashi investigates the capacity and boundaries of these elements and their ability to construct and challenge conventional concepts of form.

Born in 1983 in Los Angeles, Kelly Akashi currently lives and works in Los Angeles, California. The artist graduated with a MFA from University of Southern California in 2014. Akashi studied at the Staatliche Hochschule für Bildende Künste – Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main and received her BFA at Otis College of Art and Design in 2006.

Currently on view at the Aspen Art Museum is a new commissioned sculpture, Cultivator, which will be on view at the museum’s Crown Commons through March 2021. Winner of the 2019 Carolyn Glasoe Bailey Foundation Art Prize the artist had a residency at the foundation in Ojai, California. Other residencies include ARCH Athens, Greece (2019) and at Headlands Center for the Arts, Sausalito, CA (2019) – both of which concluded with a solo exhibition. Other important solo exhibitions include Long Exposure curated by Ruba Katrib at the SculptureCenter, New York (2017). The artist’s work is currently featured in Ground/work at the Clark Art Institute and Possédé·e·s at MoCo Montpellier Contemporain in France. Other notable group exhibitions include the Hammer Museum’s biennial, Made in L.A. (2016); Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit (2017); LA: A Fiction, Musée d’art contemporain de Lyon, France (2017); Take me (I’m Yours), curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist, Jens Hoffmann, and Kelly Taxter, Jewish Museum, New York (2016); Can’t Reach Me There, Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis (2015).

For more information about Kelly Akashi and their work, please visit their website.

Apr
12
Mon
Global Digital Humanities Symposium @ Zoom
Apr 12 – Apr 15 all-day
Global Digital Humanities Symposium @ Zoom

Digital Humanities at Michigan State University is proud to extend its symposium series on Global DH into its sixth year. Digital humanities scholarship continues to be driven by work at the intersections of a range of distinct disciplines and an ethical commitment to preserve and broaden access to cultural materials. The most engaged global DH scholarship, that which MSU champions, values digital tools that enhance the capacity of scholarly critique to reflect a broad range of literary, historical, new media, and cultural positions, and diverse ways of valuing cultural production and knowledge work. Particularly valuable are strategies in which the digital form manifests a critical perspective on the digital content and the position of the researcher to their material.

With the growth of the digital humanities, particularly in under-resourced and underrepresented areas, a number of complex issues surface, including, among others, questions of ownership, cultural theft, virtual exploitation, digital rights, endangered data, and the digital divide. We view the 2021 symposium as an opportunity to broaden the conversation about these issues. Scholarship that works across borders with foci on transnational partnerships and globally accessible data is especially welcome.

Michigan State University has been intentionally global for more than 60 years, with over 1,400 faculty involved in international research, teaching, and service. For the past 20 years, MSU has developed a strong research area in culturally engaged, global digital humanities. Matrix, a digital humanities and social science center at MSU, has done dozens of digital projects in West and Southern Africa that have focused on ethical and reciprocal relationships and capacity building. WIDE has set best practices for doing community engaged, international, archival work with the Samaritan Collections, Archive 2.0. Today many scholars in the humanities at MSU are engaged in digital projects relating to global, indigenous, and/or underrepresented groups and topics.

Find out more about this free and fully virtual event, including the Call for Proposals and Registration information at http://msuglobaldh.org.