EVENTS

Calendar

Dec
5
Mon
Inverted Mirrors: Creation and Adaptation of Biblical Myths @ B243 Wells Hall
Dec 5 @ 9:00 am
Jan
20
Fri
Panel: Israeli Contexts and Technology @ Wells Hall B-243
Jan 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Panel: Israeli Contexts and Technology @ Wells Hall B-243 | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Startup Nation: the Historical Context, the Cultural Geographic Landscape, and the Israeli Infotech Migrants in Silicon Valley and Beyond

This panel will explore the significance of Israeli high-tech industry on Israeli and American history, culture, society and economy. Dr. Tom Bielik (Weizmann Institute; post-doc at MSU) will focus on the history of first Israeli President and innovator Dr. Chaim Weizmann whose vision paved the way for the research of the Weizmann Institute of Science, one of the top-ranked research institutes in the world. Dr. Steven Fraiberg (MSU, WRAC) will focus on the cultural geographic landscape of the Israeli high-tech industry as it transitions from the socialist ideals of the kibbutz to a capitalist system based on global high-tech industries. Finally, Dr. Steven Gold (MSU, Sociology) will focus on the Israeli infotech migrants living in Silicon Valley, examining communal cooperation in San Francisco, comparing the Israeli experience to that of Indians and considering the impact of infotech Israeli involvement on the US economy.

Co-sponsored by James Madison College, the College of Arts and Letters, and the Asian Studies Center.

Jan
17
Wed
“Religion, Ethics, and Climate Change” with Dr. Jonathan Brockopp @ 303 International Center
Jan 17 @ 7:00 pm

“Religion, Ethics, and Climate Change” with  Dr. Jonathan Brockopp

Wednesday, January 17th, 7:00pm

303 International Center

 

Dec
5
Thu
HIVES Presentation/Reading with Petra Kuppers @ 300 Bessey Hall (The Writing Center)
Dec 5 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
HIVES Presentation/Reading with Petra Kuppers @ 300 Bessey Hall (The Writing Center)

Please join us and invite your students:

 

Presentation/Reading with Petra Kuppers

Petra Kuppers is a disability culture activist, a community artist, and a Professor of English, Women’s Studies, Theatre and Dance, and Art and Design

Date: Thursday, December 5, 2019

Time:  4-5:30 pm

Location: 300 Bessey Hall (The Writing Center)

 

 

Presented by HIVES, The Writing Center, and Legacies of the Enlightenment

Oct
16
Fri
Writing & Pedagogy Workshops: Anti-Racist @ via Zoom
Oct 16 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Writing & Pedagogy Workshops: Anti-Racist @ via Zoom

Anti-Racist Pedagogy and Online Teaching

Schedule: 16 October, 3 PM – 4 PM (via Zoom), with Cristóbal Martinez

This workshop is aimed to address the pressing need to implement an anti-racist pedagogy in Online Teaching. Graduate student Cristóbal Martinez will share his efforts to enact an anti-racist pedagogy for online instruction. This workshop will be open to graduate instructors affiliated with the College of Arts and Letters and we are expecting a guest speaker for the event who will give a talk about anti-racist pedagogy.

Feb
4
Thu
Jay Dolmage Lecture @ Zoom
Feb 4 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Jay Dolmage Lecture @ Zoom

Jay Dolmage: Ableism, Access, and Inclusion: Disability in Higher Education Before, During and After Covid-19.

 

In this workshop, we will collaborate to address the ableist attitudes, policies, and practices that are built into higher education. We will also interrogate the minimal and temporary means we have been given to address inequities, and the cost such an approach has for disabled students and faculty. We will explore our own ableist biases, apologies and defenses in an effort to build tools for a much more accessible future at Michigan State, while we also examine how disability has been situated in higher education before, during and (someday) after Covid-19.

RSVP Link

Feb
17
Wed
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom
Feb 17 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Margaret Price Event @ Zoom

Margaret Price: Everyday Survival and Collective Action: What We Can Learn from Disabled Faculty in a Time of Unwellness

The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has raised startling questions about everyday life—for example, “How is it possible that I am required to do a full-time job while also providing full-time care for my family?” or “How can I negotiate questions of ‘safety’ with my co-workers, my community, even my closest loved ones?” These questions surged into the limelight in 2020, yet few realize that they were already active topics of conversation in small, interdependent communities of disabled, BIPOC, queer, and otherwise marginalized people. In this talk, Margaret Price draws upon data from a survey and interview study with disabled faculty (https://margaretprice.wordpress.com/disabled-faculty-study) to highlight themes such as “time,” “cost,” “technology,” and “accountability.” These themes not only teach us more about the everyday lives and strategies of disabled faculty members, but also demonstrate that all participants in higher education will benefit from a cultural shift toward shared accountability and interdependent forms of care.

Click here to RSVP

Mar
18
Thu
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom
Mar 18 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Stephanie Kerschbaum Writing Center Event @ Zoom

Stephanie Kerschbaum

Title: “Signs of Disability in the Writing Center”

RSVP LINK

Abstract: Where and how and when does disability emerge in the writing center? In this talk, Stephanie Kerschbaum will briefly discuss her concept of “signs of disability” and how it can usefully inform the way we approach our work in the writing center. Signs of disability are material-discursive-rhetorical cues that point to the presence of disability in some way, shape or form. One way for writing center staff and tutors to orient to these signs is to think about the stories we tell about our experiences and what those stories might reveal about where we are putting our attention (or not putting it). Attendees will have a chance to do some freewriting and reflection during the talk.

Bio: Stephanie L. Kerschbaum is currently Associate Professor of English at the University of Delaware, and beginning July 1, 2021, she will be Associate Professor and Director of the Expository Writing Program at the University of Washington. Her first book, Toward a New Rhetoric of Difference, won the 2015 CCCC Advancement of Knowledge Book Award and she is the co-editor of Negotiating Disability: Disclosure and Higher Education. Her work has appeared in a range of journals and collections, and she’s currently at work on a book called Signs of Disability focused on how disability becomes available for noticing in everyday encounters. She can be reached at kersch.uw@gmail.com and loves to hear about all kinds of signs of disability from other people.

RSVP LINK