EVENTS

Calendar

Feb
21
Fri
Nuchuu: Portraits of the Northern Ute Exhibition at SCENE Metrospace @ (SCENE) Metrospace
Feb 21 @ 5:00 pm – Mar 27 @ 7:00 pm
Nuchuu: Portraits of the Northern Ute Exhibition at SCENE Metrospace @ (SCENE) Metrospace | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

February 21 – March 27, 2020

Workshop & Reception February 21 5-9pm

Nuchuu: Portraits of the Northern Ute is a solo exhibition featuring the work of Keith Secola, Mino Mashkiki Wish Kang.

Workshop Description

Through this workshop, the audience will take a deep dive through history and lineage by exploring Keith Secola’s work, process of screen printing and his use of family archives. There will be a live demonstration of his process and the opportunity for the audience to pull their own print.

Exhibition Statement

Recently my project has involved the reinsertion of the American Indian image onto collaged and deconstructed book covers of American history. I tear and collage assorted Colonial books to create my surface to print on. My source imagery derives from two archival photo albums from my Grandparents, representing my Ute Indian heritage and our band of Uncompahgre from Colorado.  American Indian stories and history are often erased or forgotten. My use of archival photography and printmaking allows me to create a layer between the past and present to form new narratives that question Native identity by fusing the imagery and the books as one.  In addition, I paint an extra layer on the surface of the wall with graphic murals of Euro-centric depictions of Eastern Coastal Native Americans around first contact. This further pushes the dichotomy of the real and the fantastic savage.

 

Keith Secola, Mino Mashkiki Wish Kang grew up in the Southwest and belongs to the Ute Indian tribe and Anishanabe Nation. He graduated from California College of the Arts MFA in San Francisco, with a focus on silkscreen printing. The earliest influences come from his father, who is a musician, traveling and exposing him to contemporary Native arts at a young age.  These early experiences would influence a life in creative arts. Finding a balance between contemporary life and tradition, Keith blends printmaking, archival photography, illustrations, and murals derived from Native American life to transmit indigenous voices and identity. The artist currently works and lives in Oakland, California.

For more information about the artist please visit his website: www.keithsecolajr.com

This exhibition and workshop was made possible thanks to support from the City of East Lansing, the MSU College of Arts & Letters, and the Department of Art, Art History, and Design.

Feb
28
Fri
C4I Lecture with Catherine Kendig @ MSU Library--Flex Space at the Digital Scholarship Lab (2nd Floor)
Feb 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
C4I Lecture with Catherine Kendig @ MSU Library--Flex Space at the Digital Scholarship Lab (2nd Floor)

Center for Interdisciplinarity (C4I) Talk

Philosophical Investigations in Ethnobotany

Catherine Kendig, Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy

Lichens have a weird naming history. They have been and continue to be classified outside the formal Linnaean system by both lichenologists and indigenous naturalists such as the Sámi and Sherpa. These informal nomenclatural practices encode knowledge about the physiology of lichen symbionts, their economic use as the basis of textile dyes, as an ingredient in bread and beer-making, the source of medicine, and as a critical foodstuff central to reindeer husbandry. These diverse nomenclatures can contribute to understanding not only in ethnolichenology, history, and physiology, but also in metaphysics. But how should we go about retaining this diverse knowledge when doing so requires much more than simply compiling a list of synonyms? I explore plural, perspectival strategies of knowledge integration, paying attention to the diverse purposes for which lichens are named and the frequently incommensurable ontologies employed to ground lichen names.

Talk begins at 12:00 and runs about 1 hour.  Networking with coffee and refreshments immediately after the talk.

About C4I: The Michigan State University Center for Interdisciplinarity (C4I) advances interdisciplinary research and pedagogy at the University while preparing the next generation of citizen leaders to address the most challenging questions of our time. In addition to conducting its own research, C4I serves as a resource for faculty, postdocs, and graduate students in the College of Arts & Letters and across campus, as well as for partners in the local community and across the region. It also serves as an advocate for researchers and scholars, consults with teams, provides resources for and about interdisciplinarity, and creates opportunities for training, education, networking, mentorship, visibility, and funding both on and off campus.

Mar
13
Fri
C4I Lecture with Krista Isaacs @ Spartan room (enter through food court)
Mar 13 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
C4I Lecture with Krista Isaacs @ Spartan room (enter through food court) | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Center for Interdisciplinarity (C4I) Talk

Brokering power and access: Case studies from Mali and India at the intersection of gender and seed systems

Krista Isaacs, Assistant Professor of International Seed Systems, Department of Plant, Soil, and Microbial Sciences

Seed systems often fail smallholder farmers and particularly the marginalized groups within, such as women or individuals of lower social status. Access and availability barriers to preferred varieties of high-quality seed limit crop productivity, the principle livelihood source for these groups. Despite decades of work to mainstream gender in agricultural development, economic empowerment of women has not always led to structural improvements in women’s livelihoods and the social and institutional power structures in societies often reinforce inequalities that hinder social development. Drawing on two case studies from Mali and India, this talk will explore how interdisciplinary approaches to agriculture research and development, that focus on cooperatives and social networks, enabled farmers access to high-quality seed, and in some cases, led to social and economic empowerment.

Talk begins at 12:00 and runs about 1 hour.  Networking with coffee and refreshments immediately after the talk.

About C4I: The Michigan State University Center for Interdisciplinarity (C4I) advances interdisciplinary research and pedagogy at the University while preparing the next generation of citizen leaders to address the most challenging questions of our time. In addition to conducting its own research, C4I serves as a resource for faculty, postdocs, and graduate students in the College of Arts & Letters and across campus, as well as for partners in the local community and across the region. It also serves as an advocate for researchers and scholars, consults with teams, provides resources for and about interdisciplinarity, and creates opportunities for training, education, networking, mentorship, visibility, and funding both on and off campus.

Mar
27
Fri
C4I Lecture with Ann Folio-White @ MSU Library--Flex Space at the Digital Scholarship Lab (2nd Floor)
Mar 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
C4I Lecture with Ann Folio-White @ MSU Library--Flex Space at the Digital Scholarship Lab (2nd Floor) | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Center for Interdisciplinarity (C4I) Talk

Acting and its Others: Labor’s Role in Defining Artistic Boundaries

Ann Folino White, Associate Professor of Theatre Studies and Directing, Department of Theatre

In 1913, the founding members of Actors’ Equity Association (AEA) drew a clear line between the actors of the legitimate theatre that they sought to organize and other performers, conceived of as non-actors. Since then, theatre and labor relations scholars largely have uncritically viewed AEA as a collective bargaining organization, overlooking how it has continued to determine the very artistic practices that constitute what is and isn’t acting. This presentation discusses immediate and long-term implications for acting (and its others) of AEA’s jurisdictional disputes, rulings, and arbitrations, considering a collection of both little-known cases (e.g. Jumbo, 1935) and infamous ones (e.g. Miss Saigon, 1990) that have fundamentally shaped acting as an artform and occupation.

Talk begins at 12:00 and runs about 1 hour.  Networking with coffee and refreshments immediately after the talk.

About C4I: The Michigan State University Center for Interdisciplinarity (C4I) advances interdisciplinary research and pedagogy at the University while preparing the next generation of citizen leaders to address the most challenging questions of our time. In addition to conducting its own research, C4I serves as a resource for faculty, postdocs, and graduate students in the College of Arts & Letters and across campus, as well as for partners in the local community and across the region. It also serves as an advocate for researchers and scholars, consults with teams, provides resources for and about interdisciplinarity, and creates opportunities for training, education, networking, mentorship, visibility, and funding both on and off campus.

Apr
9
Thu
MSU Signature Lecture Series with Claudia Rankine @ Kiva at Erickson Hall
Apr 9 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
MSU Signature Lecture Series with Claudia Rankine @ Kiva at Erickson Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Poet, essayist, playwright, and the editor of several anthologies. She is the author of five volumes of poetry, two plays, and various essays.

Her book of poetry, Citizen: An American Lyric, won the 2014 Los Angeles Times Book Award; the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry, the first book in the award’s history to be nominated in both poetry and criticism; the 2015 Forward Prize for Best Collection, the 2015 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in Poetry; the 2015 NAACP Image Award in poetry; the 2015 PEN Open Book Award; the 2015 PEN American Center USA Literary Award; the 2015 PEN Oakland-Josephine Miles Literary Award; and the 2015 VIDA Literary Award. Citizen was also a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award and the 2015 T.S. Eliot Prize. It is the only poetry book to be a New York Times Bestseller in the nonfiction category.

The Lecture will begin at 7 pm, however doors open at 6 pm.  The lecture will be livecast on the web and overflow rooms for visitors may be provided. A reception will immediately follow. A pop-up Book Sale table will be available to purchase works by Claudia Rankine.

About the Signature Lecture Series

Originally founded as the Celebrity Lecture Series in 1998 by the College of Arts & Letters and the Dean’s Community Council, the series was later renamed the Signature Lecture Series in 20017 and allows notable public figures to interact and engage with the faculty, students, and greater community of Michigan State University through conversations and discussions.

The popularity of this series has attracted some of the most illustrious scholars, critics, novelists, poets, film producers, and creative artists of our time, including Soledad O’Brien, Ken Burns, Oliver Stone, Richard Ford, and Maya Angelou, just to name a few.

Sponsors of the Signature Lecture Series are the following:

  • College of Arts & Letters
  • Broad Art Museum
  • MSU Libraries
  • Department of English
  • Creative Writing Program
  • Film Studies Program
  • Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures

This event is being held in collaboration with the MSU Broad Art Museum Artist’s Project Series “John Lucas and Claudia Rankine: Situations” Exhibition. The MSU Broad presents, for the first time in a solo exhibition, the entire series of Situation videos collaboratively produced by documentary filmmaker John Lucas and poet Claudia Rankine since 2008. The videos address the vexed notion of a post-racial United States, a term coined in the Obama era to assert that the election of an African American president indicated the achievement of racial equality, by foregrounding the public and private experiences of black Americans. The exhibition is on February 8-May 31, 2020.

Apr
10
Fri
C4I Lecture with Dylan Miner @ Flex Space at the Digital Scholarship Lab (Library)
Apr 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
C4I Lecture with Dylan Miner @ Flex Space at the Digital Scholarship Lab (Library) | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

University Interdisciplinary Colloquium

Art as Research //Research for Art

DYLAN MINER, Director, American Indian and Indigenous Studies and Associate Professor, Associate Professor, Residential College in the Arts and Humanities

In his talk, geared specifically for the Interdisciplinary Colloquium, artist and scholar Dylan Miner will discuss his own artistic practice and the research methodologies that he employs within his artmaking practice, as well as the genre-crossing nature of his work. He will use his talk to think through contemporary art as an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary practice that explodes the logics of university-based disciplinarity.

Talk is from 12-1 pm.  Coffee and cookies are available and guests are invited to stay for coffee and networking following the talk.

 

Apr
17
Fri
The Dark Legacy of the Enlightenment: Forging Race in Spanish/Latin American Casta Painting @ B342 Wells Hall
Apr 17 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The Spanish and Creole anxiety towards the
increasing racial and ethnic heterogeneity in the
colonies during the eighteenth century opened the
door to one of the dark legacies of the
Enlightenment. The fear before the offspring of
mixed-race unions, and the imperial need for social
control are the basis for the development of written
and pictorial taxonomies such as the series of
cuadros de castas (1700-1821). These paintings,
alongside discussions about castas, race and
purity of blood, highlight a paradox of the
Enlightenment: the spread of ideas about human
freedom and sovereignty and modern notions of
race and racism.