EVENTS

Calendar

Mar
14
Wed
Bioethics Series: Marleen Eijkholt @ C102 East Fee Hall
Mar 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Bioethics Series: Marleen Eijkholt @ C102 East Fee Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

This event is presented by the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences.

Professor Marleen Eijkholt, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine

Pain but No Gain: Pain as a Problematic and Useless Concept?

References to the human experience of “pain” are common, but those references are often ambiguous and vague. Such ambiguity creates conceptual and practical challenges, especially in the work of clinical ethics consultation. While pain is a relevant clinical problem, it is also a social construct shaped by culture, environment, and gender. These distinctions however get lost in a simple “pain” reference. With several clinical ethics scenarios, Dr. Eijkholt will ask if references to pain help us with anything, or if we should perhaps abandon pain as a “useless concept.”

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Mar
22
Thu
The Music of Freedom: Jazz & the Civil Rights Movement @ Club Spartan, Case Hall
Mar 22 @ 6:00 pm
The Music of Freedom: Jazz & the Civil Rights Movement @ Club Spartan, Case Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Featuring Dr. Ridley

Dr. Ridley will reflect on the interconnections and long history of jazz music and protest. In particular, he will examine the many connections between jazz and protest during the Civil Rights movement, and will talk about his collaborations with musicians committed to African American freedom and American democracy. Dr. Ridley will also discuss his role as an educator and the benefits of jazz education to the arts and American society.

Mar
23
Fri
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Thomas Reydon @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Mar 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Thomas Reydon @ 530 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Professor Thomas Reydon, Institute of Philosophy, Centre for Ethics and Philosophy of Science (CEPS) & Centre for Ethics and Law in the Life Sciences (CELLS), Leibniz Universität Hannover

How far do evolutionary explanations reach?

The notion of evolution is often used in an overly loose sense. Besides biological evolution, there i stalk of the evolution of societies, cities, languages, firms, industries, economies, technical artifacts, car models, clothing fashions, science, the universe, and so on. While in some cases the no%on of evolution is used in a metaphorical way, in other cases it is meant more literally. But exactly how much can be explained by applying an evolutionary framework to cases outside the biological realm? Can applications of evolutionary theory outside biology have a similar explanatory force as in biology? Proponents of so-called “Generalized Darwinism” think it can. I will critically examine this view by treating it as a ques%on about the metaphysics of evolutionary phenomena: To what extent do such different processes of change instan%ate the same kind of process? I will explore this question by looking at some of the conceptual requirements for generalized versions of evolutionary theory to have explanatory force in a particular domain of investigation. Because having good explanations of phenomena under study is crucial for our ability to predict and control them, this is not merely an issue of theoretical interest in the philosophy of science – it has real consequences for society and human life too.

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Mar
28
Wed
“Not in Kansas Any More: Holocaust Movies for Children” @ Club Spartan, Case Hall
Mar 28 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
"Not in Kansas Any More: Holocaust Movies for Children" @ Club Spartan, Case Hall  | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

DR. LAWRENCE BARON

PROFESSOR EMERITUS, SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY
FORMER NASATIR CHAIR OF MODERN JEWISH HISTORY AND DIRECTOR OF THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM

As the Holocaust increasingly has been incorporated into public education, feature films, often based on juvenile Holocaust fiction or classic children’s novels are being made. This lecture looks at this trend starting with Disney’s The Devil in Vienna through The Boy in Striped Pajamas.

Apr
6
Fri
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Brian Burkhart @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Apr 6 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Brian Burkhart @ 530 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States
Professor Brian Burkhart, California State University, Northridge
Decoloniality and Indigenous Environmental Philosophy Through the Land
In this talk, I will articulate what I see as the interwoven threads of the nature and the power of coloniality in the attempted obscuring of being-in-the-land and being-from-the-land. It is the imaginary conception of being as a delocalized or kinless conqueror by which European locality can conceptualize an uprooting of itself and a replanting into Indigenous land–land that has also been reimagined as mere land rather than as the fundamental ontological capacity of kinship itself. Regrounding concepts of knowledge, being, morality, and even sovereignty in land, understood as the fundamental ontological capacity of kinship, disrupts some of the fundamental force of coloniality and opens a space for conceptualizing an environmental philosophy that mirrors existing Indigenous environmental concepts and practices.
Apr
11
Wed
Bioethics Series: Reshma Jagsi @ C102 East Fee Hall
Apr 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Bioethics Series: Reshma Jagsi @ C102 East Fee Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

This event is presented by the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences.

Professor Reshma Jagsi, Department of Radiation Oncology, Director of Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School

Ethical Issues Related to Fundraising from Grateful Patients

Healthcare institutions are becoming increasingly deliberate about philanthropic fundraising given the need to sustain their missions in the face of decreases in governmental research funds and lowering reimbursement for clinical care. Donations from grateful patients constitute 20% of all philanthropic contributions to academic medical centers, totaling nearly $1 billion a year in recent years. Little evidence exists to guide the ethical practice of grateful patient fundraising, and concerns exist regarding privacy and confidentiality, patient vulnerability, and physicians’ conflicts of obligations in this context.

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Apr
13
Fri
Undergraduate Philosophy Conference @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Apr 13 @ 3:00 pm – Apr 14 @ 5:00 pm

The 8th Annual MSU Undergraduate Philosophy Conference will start with Prof. Christopher Yeomans’s keynote lecture titled “The Temporal Strata of Historical Experience” on Friday, April 13th.

The conference will continue on Saturday, April 14th with student papers.

See the full program for the conference

Undergraduate Philosophy Conference: Prof. Christopher Yeomans @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Apr 13 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Undergraduate Philosophy Conference: Prof. Christopher Yeomans @ 530 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Christopher Yeomans, Purdue University

The Temporal Strata of Historical Experience

In this paper, I try to reconstruct the way that concepts, time and history are connected in the thought of G.W.F. Hegel. My starting point is a famous criticism of Hegel’s theory of time by Martin Heidegger, according to which it represents the apotheosis of our everyday,unthinking conception of time as being essentially like space, i.e., a series of nows one right after the other in the same way that space represents a series of points simply next to each other (SZ §82). In reply, I argue that for Hegel, historical experience consists of the interaction of multiple temporal perspectives, each manifesting a distinctive kind of logical perspective. This gives Hegel’s thought a unique perspective on the question of historical progress.

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Apr
20
Fri
Philosophy Suter Lecture: Alice Crary @ 107 South Kedzie Hall
Apr 20 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philosophy Suter Lecture: Alice Crary @ 107 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Professor Alice Crary, New School for Social Research

The Methodological is the Political

Any feminism worthy of the name must direct attention to the interrelatedness of systems of oppression and must in this sense be politically radical. This core political lesson of some Second Wave feminist writings has an important methodological aspect. Many feminist thinkers contend that the intersecting patterns of behavior constitutive of gender-based abuses are recognizable as the abuses they are only when looked at in the light of an appreciation of the significance of forms of social vulnerability that pervasive gender-bias occasions. These thinkers suggest that, if we are to combat sexist social formations, we therefore need to complement our political radicalism with a methodological radicalism that involves making use of the practical power of ethically non-neutral resources, conceived as in themselves cognitively authoritative. Despite its apparent widespread acceptance, this methodological precept goes missing in an emerging body of feminist theory loosely associated with analytic philosophy. The current article takes Miranda Fricker’s celebrated 2007 book Epistemic Injustice as representative of this developing feminist corpus, bringing out how Fricker unquestioningly—and incorrectly—takes for granted that ethical neutrality is a regulative ideal for all world-directed thought. The article’s ambition is to revive venerable calls for ethically nonneutral modes of feminist social criticism by showing that the methodological conservativism to which Fricker is committed is fatal to feminist politics.

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Sep
16
Sun
Israel at 70 Conference @ Kellogg Center
Sep 16 – Sep 17 all-day
Israel at 70 Conference @ Kellogg Center | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

To commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the State of Israel and reflect on that history, the Michigan State University Jewish Studies Program is very proud to sponsor its largest academic conference ever: “Israel at 70: Complexity, Challenge, and Creativity” on September 16-17, 2018 at MSU’s Kellogg Center.

The conference brings together 40 internationally recognized scholars from Israel and the United States under one roof to discuss Israeli society, culture, politics, foreign policy, and agricultural, biomedical, water, environmental, and business innovation.

If you are interested in attending please register at https://msuisraelat70.eventbrite.com. If you have any further questions please contact Amy Shapiro at 517-432-3493.