EVENTS

Calendar

Mar
14
Wed
Bioethics Series: Marleen Eijkholt @ C102 East Fee Hall
Mar 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Bioethics Series: Marleen Eijkholt @ C102 East Fee Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

This event is presented by the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences.

Professor Marleen Eijkholt, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine

Pain but No Gain: Pain as a Problematic and Useless Concept?

References to the human experience of “pain” are common, but those references are often ambiguous and vague. Such ambiguity creates conceptual and practical challenges, especially in the work of clinical ethics consultation. While pain is a relevant clinical problem, it is also a social construct shaped by culture, environment, and gender. These distinctions however get lost in a simple “pain” reference. With several clinical ethics scenarios, Dr. Eijkholt will ask if references to pain help us with anything, or if we should perhaps abandon pain as a “useless concept.”

event flyer

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Teaching to who and where students are: Making courses accessible @ Digital Scholarship Lab (2nd floor of the west wing in the MSU Main Library)
Mar 14 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Teaching to who and where students are: Making courses accessible @ Digital Scholarship Lab (2nd floor of the west wing in the MSU Main Library)

Presenters: Madeline Shellgren

This workshop focuses on various notions of accessibility. We will start with questioning who students are and why that is important to consider. Together, we will also explore ways to make space for identity and student agency, discussing how we can help create opportunities for students to empower themselves and find relevance in course content, curriculum, and design. We will then move to ways to critically leverage today’s technology, specifically focusing on intentional and ongoing work we can do as instructors to remove barriers to information and education.

Mar
15
Thu
Liaisons in French: What are students really learning in class? @ B135 Wells Hall
Mar 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Liaisons in French: What are students really learning in class? @ B135 Wells Hall

Presenter: Dr. Anne Violin-Wigent

As part of my current investigation on the effectiveness of explicit instruction, this project investigates the evolution of the accuracy of French liaisons produced by students over a semester. Do they actually produce French liaisons more accurately after they are given the list of explicit rules than before? How do they change after the lesson? After a brief explanation of what French liaisons are, I will present preliminary results that compare students enrolled in a French phonetics and pronunciation class (FRN 330) where they are taught the rules, to students enrolled in FRN 320, a grammar and writing class that does not include liaisons at all.

This workshop meets on Thursday from 3-4 pm in B135 Wells Hall. Cookies and coffee will be served.

Mar
16
Fri
SLS Practice Talks for LARC, AAAL, & TESOL @ B342 Wells
Mar 16 @ 8:15 am – 11:00 am

Come to see graduate students in the SLS Program present the research they will share at upcoming national conferences!

8:15 AM: Dan Isbell and Susie Kim: Works-in-Progress session: Please choose to sit at Dan Isbell or Susie Kim’s end of the conference table and hear what they are working on in progress. This session matches the Works-in-Progress session round tables at the Language Assessment Research Colloquium (LARC)
8:30 AM: Wendy Li & Jongbong Lee: Paper presentation: Writing in and for EGR 100: A Vygotskian perspective on becoming an engineer
9:00 AM, Xiaowan Zhang: Paper presentation: Test validity: Perceptions of students and teachers
9:30 AM: Xuehong (Stella) He & Wendy Li: Working Memory, Inhibitory Control, and Learning L2 Grammar with Input-Output Activities: Evidence from Eye Movements
10:00 AM: Susie Kim: Capital, Ideology, and Value Creation: A Case Study of an American Learner of Korean
10:30 AM: Shinhye Lee: Planning time and task types in oral test performance: An investigation into the TOEFL iBT Speaking test tasks

Coffee and breakfast provided.

One World, Many Stories: Family Dance Party @ East Lansing Public Library
Mar 16 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
One World, Many Stories: Family Dance Party @ East Lansing Public Library | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

The 11th annual family literacy event, One World, Many Stories is proud to present Connie Schofield-Morrison’s, I Got the Rhythm, a book about expressing yourself through dance and music and being inspired by the rhythm from the world around us.

Please join us for a book reading by Marble Elementary Principal Josh Robertson. Following the reading, there will be a Family Dance Party featuring DJ Rod Carpenter, accompanied by members of MSU Pompon Team. The first 100 families get a FREE copy of the featured book! The entire event is free and open to the public.

Schedule
5:30pm-6pm Pizza Dinner
6pm-6:15pm Book Reading by Marble Elementary Principal, Josh Robertson
6:15pm-7:30pm Family Dance Party Featuring DJ Rod Carpenter and Members of the MSU Pompon Team

One World, Many Stories is a community-based program for young children of all cultures. In collaboration with Michigan State University, East Lansing Public Library, and the East Lansing Public Schools, this initiative promotes family reading practices with interactive events that expose children to a variety of cultures and ideas. For the past five years, the books that were selected for this event have highlighted the importance of community participation, global citizenship, and intercultural understanding.

Mar
21
Wed
Promoting foreign language study in middle schools @ B135 Wells Hall
Mar 21 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Promoting foreign language study in middle schools @ B135 Wells Hall

Presenter: Alissa Cohen

This workshop will explore some of the challenges of promoting language study among American school children and look at the CeLTA Fellowship project I conducted this year to address some of these challenges. I will provide an overview of a language exploration club that was designed to introduce students at East Lansing’s MacDonald Middle School to the study of foreign languages in general and, more specifically, to the languages offered at the school, French, German, and Spanish. The goal of the project was twofold: To promote foreign language study by middle schoolers and to promote service learning and teaching practice by MSU students in the fields of language learning and teaching. Participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to review and evaluate the structure, materials, and outcomes of the program and contribute to the revision process, with an ultimate goal of encouraging greater future participation among the middle schoolers and MSU student teacher volunteers and to create contacts and collaborations across the many MSU units involved in promoting language teaching and learning.

Mar
22
Thu
Workshop with Dr. Graeme Porte: Replication Research @ A222 Wells Hall
Mar 22 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

If a job’s worth doing, it’s worth doing twice: Doing replication research

Join us for a workshop on replication research!

Dr. Graeme Porte from the University of Granada will lead us through a workshop on why replication research is important, and more importantly, how to do it well.

http://www.ugr.es/~gporte/

Sponsored by Second Language Studies
Michigan State University

Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 3-6pm
A222 Wells Hall

Everyone is invited. See the flyer/abstract for his talk here: http://sls.msu.edu/files/4715/0611/3851/PorteWorkshop.pdf

The Music of Freedom: Jazz & the Civil Rights Movement @ Club Spartan, Case Hall
Mar 22 @ 6:00 pm
The Music of Freedom: Jazz & the Civil Rights Movement @ Club Spartan, Case Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Featuring Dr. Ridley

Dr. Ridley will reflect on the interconnections and long history of jazz music and protest. In particular, he will examine the many connections between jazz and protest during the Civil Rights movement, and will talk about his collaborations with musicians committed to African American freedom and American democracy. Dr. Ridley will also discuss his role as an educator and the benefits of jazz education to the arts and American society.

Mar
23
Fri
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Thomas Reydon @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Mar 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Thomas Reydon @ 530 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Professor Thomas Reydon, Institute of Philosophy, Centre for Ethics and Philosophy of Science (CEPS) & Centre for Ethics and Law in the Life Sciences (CELLS), Leibniz Universität Hannover

How far do evolutionary explanations reach?

The notion of evolution is often used in an overly loose sense. Besides biological evolution, there i stalk of the evolution of societies, cities, languages, firms, industries, economies, technical artifacts, car models, clothing fashions, science, the universe, and so on. While in some cases the no%on of evolution is used in a metaphorical way, in other cases it is meant more literally. But exactly how much can be explained by applying an evolutionary framework to cases outside the biological realm? Can applications of evolutionary theory outside biology have a similar explanatory force as in biology? Proponents of so-called “Generalized Darwinism” think it can. I will critically examine this view by treating it as a ques%on about the metaphysics of evolutionary phenomena: To what extent do such different processes of change instan%ate the same kind of process? I will explore this question by looking at some of the conceptual requirements for generalized versions of evolutionary theory to have explanatory force in a particular domain of investigation. Because having good explanations of phenomena under study is crucial for our ability to predict and control them, this is not merely an issue of theoretical interest in the philosophy of science – it has real consequences for society and human life too.

event flyer (with time & location details)

Apr
4
Wed
CeLTA grant updates: Language Proficiency Flagship and LCTL Partnership @ B135 Wells Hall
Apr 4 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
CeLTA grant updates: Language Proficiency Flagship and LCTL Partnership @ B135 Wells Hall

Presenters: Drs. Susan Gass, Paula Winke, Koen Van Gorp, and Emily Heidrich

Join us to hear updates on the Language Proficiency Flagship Initiative, funded by the National Security Education Program within the Defense Language and National Security Education Office. The presenters will also discuss the progress of the Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTL) Partnership, a cross-university initiative funded by the Mellon Foundation.