EVENTS

Calendar

Feb
1
Thu
MSU Latinx Film Festival
Feb 1 – Feb 4 all-day
MSU Latinx Film Festival
Get ready for the first MSU Latinx Film Festival!
 
The inaugural edition of the festival features films from the United States, México, Perú, Bolivia, Venezuela, Brazil and Spain. You won’t find these films in U.S. movie theaters or on Netflix so please join us for great cinema and conversations you can’t have anywhere else!
 
Free screenings open to the public will be held at the MSU Library and the MSU RCAH Theater (Snyder-Phillips Hall), The Robin Theatre in REO Town and Studio C! at Meridian Mall (in conjunction with the East Lansing Film Festival Indie Series) from February 1-4, 2018.
 
All films will be followed by Q&A sessions with the directors or interactive panel discussions with MSU faculty, graduate students and community leaders. Keep updated on festival news by connecting with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram through our website: msulatinxfilmfestival.com
 
For more information and media inquires, please contact us at msu.lxff@gmail.com.
Mar
29
Thu
Visiting Scholar Lecture: Dr. Elizabeth Sanders @ 107, South Kedzie Hall
Mar 29 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Visiting Scholar Lecture: Dr. Elizabeth Sanders @ 107, South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Dr. Elizabeth Sanders introduced many of the tools and methods being used today to drive and/ or inspire design from a human-centered perspective. Sanders teaches Design at The Ohio State University and is the founder of MakeTools. Recently she co-authored Convivial Toolbox: Generative Research for the Front End Design.

Oct
16
Tue
Del Harrow Visiting Artist Lecture @ 109 South Kedzie Hall
Oct 16 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Del Harrow Visiting Artist Lecture @ 109 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

DEL HARROW/ OCTOBER 16 / 109 S KEDZIE / 6PM

Spanning the genres of sculpture, ceramics and design, Del Harrow is an Associate Professor at CSU. His art practice integrates traditional manual and skill-based forming processes with digital fabrication technology. His work is an ongoing exploration of the possibility that a tactile physical form might contain, creating sites for the imagination and the thinking of thoughts.

For more information about Del Harrow, please visit:

del harrow

Jan
21
Mon
The Wash (as it seams) @ MSU Union Art Gallery
Jan 21 @ 12:00 pm – Mar 2 @ 2:00 pm
The Wash (as it seams) @ MSU Union Art Gallery | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

MSU Union Art Gallery

49 Abbott Road, Rm. 230, East Lansing, MI 48824

 

The Wash (As It Seams)

Solo exhibition featuring the work of Babette Shaw.

January 21 – March 2, 2019

Artist Lecture January 31 6pm, Natural Science Rm. 326

Exhibition Reception February 1, 6 ­– 8pm

 

 

Babette Shaw Artist Statement

As human beings, we communicate through language, visual and verbal.  We have within us an innate desire to connect with one another, yet our language, essential to communication, often serves to polarize us both interpersonally and through the maintenance of institutionalized systems of dominance, oppression, and coercion.  Inherent within our language are misogynistic words, phrases, and ideals that inform us and affect the way we interact with one another.

Inception of this work began with a certain group of political leaders speaking mis-information about womxn’s bodies; as a consequence, most womxn, regardless of party alignment, voted against their interests.  Yet, statements and occurrences made public throughout the recent United States election processes reveal what low-base views we are willing to accept about womxn, however damaging or oppressive to the potential growth beyond them.  Misogynistic language, gendered ideals, gendered scripts influence our politics, our laws, our institutions, the wage gap, our public and personal spaces, our social and interpersonal relationships.  These bodies of work are representative of personal narratives and of individual womxn who have chosen to share their stories.

Babette Shaw Bio

Babette Shaw, native to California, is an exhibiting photography-based social practice artist whose work includes photography, sculpture, fiber art, installation, and the written or spoken word.

She received her MFA in Photography from The University of Memphis with undergraduate academic pursuits in fine art photography, creative writing, and gender studies.  As an artist, she addresses issues concerning gender and race constructions and disparities in contemporary culture, as well as their historic and archaic underpinnings. Shaw currently teaches at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro.  Alongside her art practice and her teaching, she has served on numerous panels for organizations, including the National Center for Research on Women (CROW), and has given lectures at various academic and community-based institutions. Her work is in public and private collections across the country.

Shaw is here to engage the Michigan State University campus as Visiting Artist and Scholar to invite students, past and present (as well as other members from the community), to participate in one of her social practice projects, The Panty Project, which is designed to help individuals and communities heal from gendered and sexual trauma and abuse. While on campus, Shaw will be meeting with womxn from the greater MSU community who have chosen to share their stories as part of this ongoing work. If you are interested in participating in The Panty Project, please email b@babetteshaw.com.

Jan
31
Thu
Babette Shaw Visiting Artist Lecture @ 326 Natural Science
Jan 31 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Babette Shaw Visiting Artist Lecture @ 326 Natural Science | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

BABETTE SHAW / JANUARY 31 / 326 NATURAL SCIENCE / 6PM                                                                                 Photography-based social practice artist, Babette Shaw addresses issues concerning gender and race constructions and disparities in contemporary culture, as well as their archaic underpinnings. Shaw teaches at UNC, Greensboro and her lecture accompanies a solo exhibition at the MSU Union Art Gallery.

Feb
23
Sat
Learning Symposium: A Conversation Among CALLeagues @ Wells Hall (B-Wing Classrooms)
Feb 23 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The primary activity at this event will be low-stakes, open house-style Table Presentations with “lightning talks” focusing specifically on Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) and ed tech tools and practices more generally. MSU’s Center for Language Training and Advancement (CeLTA) and hosts Adam Gacs (German) and Shannon Spasova (Russian) will also facilitate several presentations that will be broadcast and recorded for online participants.

Apr
13
Sat
Mind the Gap: Bridging the Researcher-Teacher Divide @ Wells Hall, B-Wing
Apr 13 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

This mini-conference event brings researchers and teachers together in dialogue around the questions “Do teachers care about research?” and “Do researchers care about teachers?” Plenary session presentations by researcher Dr. Masatoshi Sato (Universidad Andrés Bello, Chile) and a language educator (TBD) will be followed by a mixer in smaller break-out rooms, where language researchers and language teachers will engage in guided but informal dialogue. The event will conclude with a Town Hall-style forum, facilitated by MSU’s Second Language Studies program chair, Dr. Shawn Loewen.

Oct
11
Fri
Abstraction, Bare Life, and Counter-Narratives of Mobility: A lecture by Professor Robert Burgoyne @ B122 Wells Hall
Oct 11 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Abstraction, Bare Life, and Counter-Narratives of Mobility: A lecture by Professor Robert Burgoyne @ B122 Wells Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States
In this presentation, Professor Robert Burgoyne considers the contrasting portrayals of refugees and mass migration in the films of Richard Mosse and Ai Weiwei as an attempt to move beyond the conventional visual rhetoric for representing the stateless population. The extraordinary black, white and grey images that comprise Mosse’s multi- part work, Incoming—recorded with a thermal camera that reads the heat emanating from the body—creates a visual record that is at once the trace of intimate biological processes and an alarming, disorienting representation of a tragedy that is both consequential to and distant from our daily lives. In contrast, Ai Weiwei’s film Human Flow depicts the practice of hospitality as a symbolic antidote to the idea of the stateless person as threat. Emphasizing the right to be “at home” anywhere in the world, Ai’s interviews with refugees attempt to facilitate what Hannah Arendt calls the “public performance of voice,” opening a space of belonging through the sharing of stories. However, the representation of stateless persons through the lens of empathy and hospitality also conveys its own forms of disempowerment and complicity. Arendt’s 1951 essay, “The Decline of the Nation-State and the End of the Rights of Man,” provides a critical touchstone for this analysis.
 
Details on Human Flowhttps://www.humanflow.com
 
Generously sponsored by: the Film Studies Program and the Department of English, the Department of Art, Art History, & Design, and Global Studies in the Arts & Humanities.

Event Flyer