EVENTS

Calendar

Feb
2
Fri
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Lauren Bialystok @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Feb 2 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Lauren Bialystok @ 530 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Professor Lauren Bialystok, Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

‘My Child, My Choice’? Parents’ Identity Claims and the Challenge of Sexuality Education

Many claims for recognition and special treatment take the form of asserting an identity and insisting that it imposes ethical obligations on others (“I am x, therefore you must y”). Claims of sexual identity are paradigmatically of this form: being gay or being gender non-binary, for example, entail certain treatment or non-interference by others because of their inviolability as identities. Parents who oppose progressive sexuality education are increasingly articulating their objections in an analogous form, i.e. in virtue of their identity as parents. But what kind of an identity is “parent”? By considering authority over sexuality education in terms of these identity dynamics (as opposed to, say, parental rights), I show that educational ethics demand a deeper account of what identity is and whose identities matter.

event flyer (with time & location details)

Feb
14
Wed
Bioethics Series: Mark Navin @ C102 East Fee Hall
Feb 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Bioethics Series: Mark Navin @ C102 East Fee Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

This event is presented by the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences.

Professor Mark Navin, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Oakland University

What’s the point of Michigan’s vaccine waiver education requirement?

Since 2015, Michigan parents have had to attend education sessions at public health offices if they want their unvaccinated or under-vaccinated children to attend school or daycare. This policy seems to have succeeded: the state’s nonmedical exemption rate declined by 35% from 2014 to 2015. But what explains this apparent success? Are parents changing their minds as a result of mandatory vaccine education, or are they choosing to vaccinate rather than be inconvenienced by education sessions? Also, does vaccine education promote additional public health goals, i.e. other than short-term vaccination compliance? This presentation will attempt to answer these questions by drawing on immunization records, interviews with public health staff, and surveys of health department leaders, with the goal of informing arguments about the value of Michigan’s vaccine waiver education policy.
Feb
16
Fri
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Kelly Parker @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Feb 16 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Kelly Parker @ 530 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Professor Kelly Parker, Department of Philosophy, Grand Valley State University

Philosophizing for Catastrophe: Resilience and the Limits of Sustainability

Environmental philosophers have recently begun to consider “resilience”–alongside or even instead of “sustainability”–as a central normative concept. This seems to reflect a recognition of indeterminate catastrophe as a certainty that people will face, as well as a change in our general expectations about how to manage the effects of catastrophe. Part 1 of this presentation provides an overview of several varieties of resilience, their relation to aspects of sustainability, and raises cautions about this shift in attention. Part 2 explores the role of philosophy in preparing for catastrophe. On the more abstract side, philosophy may provide some appropriate perspective on catastrophes; on the practical side, developing education and development strategies to build capacity for resilience in communities is a needed philosophical project. The presentation concludes with examples of such local, community engaged, collaborative, and transdisciplinary philosophical projects for developing community resilience.

event flyer (with time & location details)

Mar
2
Fri
University Interdisciplinarity Colloquium @ MSU Union, Lake Superior Room
Mar 2 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
University Interdisciplinarity Colloquium @ MSU Union, Lake Superior Room  | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Discussion by Kyle Whyte about Indigenous approaches to the ethics of knowledge exchange.

Mar
14
Wed
Bioethics Series: Marleen Eijkholt @ C102 East Fee Hall
Mar 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Bioethics Series: Marleen Eijkholt @ C102 East Fee Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

This event is presented by the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences.

Professor Marleen Eijkholt, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine

Pain but No Gain: Pain as a Problematic and Useless Concept?

References to the human experience of “pain” are common, but those references are often ambiguous and vague. Such ambiguity creates conceptual and practical challenges, especially in the work of clinical ethics consultation. While pain is a relevant clinical problem, it is also a social construct shaped by culture, environment, and gender. These distinctions however get lost in a simple “pain” reference. With several clinical ethics scenarios, Dr. Eijkholt will ask if references to pain help us with anything, or if we should perhaps abandon pain as a “useless concept.”

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Watch Live Online

Mar
15
Thu
MSU Big Read 2018 Kickoff @ Green Room MSU Main Library
Mar 15 @ 7:00 pm
MSU Big Read 2018 Kickoff @ Green Room MSU Main Library | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Join us for the kickoff of the MSU Big Read 2018! A screening of the short film What Happens to a Dream Deferred will be accompanied by a panel discussion with Veronica Thronson, José Badillo-Carlos, and Osvaldo Sandoval.

Mar
20
Tue
Screening of “The Magnificent Seven” (1960) @ Downtown Lansing Branch - Capital Area District Libraries
Mar 20 @ 6:30 pm
Screening of "The Magnificent Seven" (1960) @ Downtown Lansing Branch - Capital Area District Libraries | Lansing | Michigan | United States

A screening of The Magnificent Seven (1960) will be happening at the Downtown Lansing branch of the Capital Area District Libraries on March 20th.

Film Summary: A Mexican village is at the mercy of Calvera, the leader of a band of outlaws. The townspeople, too afraid to fight for themselves, hire seven American gunslingers to free them from the bandits’ raids. The professional gunmen train the villagers to defend themselves, then plan a trap for the evil Calvera.

Mar
22
Thu
The Music of Freedom: Jazz & the Civil Rights Movement @ Club Spartan, Case Hall
Mar 22 @ 6:00 pm
The Music of Freedom: Jazz & the Civil Rights Movement @ Club Spartan, Case Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Featuring Dr. Ridley

Dr. Ridley will reflect on the interconnections and long history of jazz music and protest. In particular, he will examine the many connections between jazz and protest during the Civil Rights movement, and will talk about his collaborations with musicians committed to African American freedom and American democracy. Dr. Ridley will also discuss his role as an educator and the benefits of jazz education to the arts and American society.

Mar
23
Fri
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Thomas Reydon @ 530 South Kedzie Hall
Mar 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Philosophy Guest Speaker: Thomas Reydon @ 530 South Kedzie Hall | East Lansing | Michigan | United States

Professor Thomas Reydon, Institute of Philosophy, Centre for Ethics and Philosophy of Science (CEPS) & Centre for Ethics and Law in the Life Sciences (CELLS), Leibniz Universität Hannover

How far do evolutionary explanations reach?

The notion of evolution is often used in an overly loose sense. Besides biological evolution, there i stalk of the evolution of societies, cities, languages, firms, industries, economies, technical artifacts, car models, clothing fashions, science, the universe, and so on. While in some cases the no%on of evolution is used in a metaphorical way, in other cases it is meant more literally. But exactly how much can be explained by applying an evolutionary framework to cases outside the biological realm? Can applications of evolutionary theory outside biology have a similar explanatory force as in biology? Proponents of so-called “Generalized Darwinism” think it can. I will critically examine this view by treating it as a ques%on about the metaphysics of evolutionary phenomena: To what extent do such different processes of change instan%ate the same kind of process? I will explore this question by looking at some of the conceptual requirements for generalized versions of evolutionary theory to have explanatory force in a particular domain of investigation. Because having good explanations of phenomena under study is crucial for our ability to predict and control them, this is not merely an issue of theoretical interest in the philosophy of science – it has real consequences for society and human life too.

event flyer (with time & location details)

Mar
28
Wed
Screening of “The Magnificent Seven” (2016) @ Downtown Lansing Branch - Capital Area District Libraries
Mar 28 @ 6:30 pm
Screening of "The Magnificent Seven" (2016) @ Downtown Lansing Branch - Capital Area District Libraries | Lansing | Michigan | United States

A screening of The Magnificent Seven (2016) will be happening at the Downtown Lansing branch of the Capital Area District Libraries on March 28th.

Film Summary: Looking to mine for gold, greedy industrialist Bartholomew Bogue seizes control of the Old West town of Rose Creek. With their lives in jeopardy, Emma Cullen and other desperate residents turn to bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Denzel Washington) for help. Chisolm recruits an eclectic group of gunslingers to take on Bogue and his ruthless henchmen. With a deadly showdown on the horizon, the seven mercenaries soon find themselves fighting for more than just money once the bullets start to fly.